Book Club: Tim Lilburn’s “Kill-site”

Sun rising over wheat fields, blurry silhouette of a person.

It’s the end of summer, and that means a conclusion to the Terra Informa Summer Book Club. This month, we read Tim Lilburn’s Kill-site, a collection of poems exploring ecology, colonialism and spirituality through the landscape of Southern Saskatchewan. For the children’s segment, we tackle a classic, Dennis Lee’s Alligator Pie.

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Tim Lilburn’s Kill-site

From the publisher:

To his virtuoso collection of new poems, Tim Lilburn brings a philosopher’s mind and the eyes and ears of a marsh hawk. This series of earthy meditations makes the strange familiar and the familiar strange. Lilburn’s close study of goldenrod, an ice sheet, or night opens into surprising interior and subterranean worlds. Pythagoras lurks within the poplars, Socrates in stones, people fly below the ground. Elsewhere, the human presence of motels and beer parlours is ominous. Kill-site is an exploration of a human’s animal nature. Lilburn invites the reader to: “Go below the small things… then / walk inside them and you have their kindness.” Though a natural progression from Lilburn’s last book, To the River, in Kill-site, the poet moves toward a greater understanding of the human, of sacrifice.

Dennis Lee’s Alligator Pie

From Amazon.com:

Before Dennis Lee published Alligator Pie in 1974, the only poetry most Canadian children knew by heart was Mother Goose. Reading to his own daughters, the Governor General’s Award-winning poet had noticed that the “jolly millers, little pigs and queens” of the old rhymes were no longer “home grown” and recognizable. So he started experimenting with a new kind of nursery rhyme, “not abolishing Mother Goose, but letting her take up residence among hockey sticks and high-rises.” Alligator Pie was an immediate hit, and generations since have grown up chanting Lee’s toe-tapping nonsense about laundromats, skyscrapers, rattlesnakes, and windshield wipers.

Rain Gardens & the Peoples’ Social Forum

Kelly Pike

This week, completely unintentionally, we’re all in Ontario! We’ve got a story from Hamilton for anyone with a roof over their heads—did you know it might be making life harder for your local wetland? Rain gardens can help, and we’re going to find out how to make them. We’re also stopping in on the Peoples’ Social Forum in Ottawa, where thousands of community activists and organizations are cooking up a social change soup. We’ll find out how they intend to work together to build Canada’s future.

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The Tale of the Evans Cherry

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This week, we’ve got a special segment of Dispatches of the Dirt brought to you by Terrainforma’s Danielle Dolgoy and Hamdi Issawi. Find out how the magical Evans Cherry came to be in Edmonton’s supposedly unforgiving climate!

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On Music and Remediation

Oyster mushrooms can be used in the remediations of pollutants such as petrolium and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

Oyster mushrooms can be used in the remediation of pollutants such as petroleum and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

This week we talk to two remarkable people whose environmental concerns figure prominently in their work. First, we reconnect with Leila Darwish, the author of Earth Repair, for an explanation and illustration of bioremediation. Then, singer-songwriter Morgan MacDonald shares how environmental issues strike a chord in his music.

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Stories that Sizzle

Nearly-naked cyclists zoom by in Albany, NY

The World Naked Bike Ride is celebrated in many different cities, as Halifax organizer Ben Caplan tells us on this week’s show

The dog days of summer are upon us, and in keeping with the climate, this week’s show is sizzling. From naked cyclists to incendiary writers, and fiery film to free range eggs.

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July Book Club: The Year of the Flood and For the Birds

A photo of Margaret Atwood

For the July edition of Terra Informa’s summer book club, we dive into Margaret Atwood’s The Year of the Flood, the second volume in the MaddAddam trilogy. This week we’ll discuss some of the issues raised by the book and our own thoughts on the story. For our younger listeners, we also take a peek at Atwood’s children’s book For the Birds. Warning: this episode contains spoilers!

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The South Saskatchewan Regional Plan is finished. Here’s how the final version reflects your feedback.

terrainforma:

Thoughts on the plan? How will it affect ranchers, endangered species like the Greater Sage Grouse, and communities affected by fracking?

Originally posted on Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development:

SSRP bannerThe SSRPhas been a long time in the making. Over three phases of consultation we heard from 7,500 Albertans and received 2,000 online workbooks and written submissions.

The views and ideas we heard were diverse to say the least (you can check out all the summaries of the consultation sessions here). But there were also some concerns and ideas that we heard in almost every community we visited. We’ve made changes based on those comments.

Today, we’re happy to announce that the SSRP has been finalized. Here are some of the changes we’ve made to reflect your feedback: SSRP sign Taber 2013

  • More land for the Castle Wildland Provincial Park (now 54,588 hectares) and Pekisko Heritage Rangeland (34,356 hectares)
  • A formal commitment to work with our stakeholders to explore conservation opportunities in the Twin River and Onefour Heritage Rangeland Natural Areas of the grasslands
  • Improved connectivity for wildlife habitats, both within…

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Years of Living Dangerously, Biochar, and Water Conservation

Misting sprinklers watering a lawn sidewalk

This week on Terra Informa we hear from Katie MacKissick, a Californian who tells us why she’s proud of her dry, dead lawn. We also share a discussion on Years of Living Dangerously, Showtime’s new documentary series on the effects of climate change, plus a Ecobabble that gives you the dirt on biochar.

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