How We Live

This week on Terra Informa, we’re taking a look at how environmental issues cut close to the way people live; how we travel, how we eat, and how big issues like climate change affect us in our day-to-day lives.

Edmonton’s annual Bikeology festival is a way for Edmontonians to make a connection and a change with the city’s cycling community. We also dive deep into Ecuador to explore the  hurdles of nature being a legal entity, and also the term “Just Sustainability” and what it means for us as individuals concerned about social justice and sustainability.

How We Live

Karly Coleman is the one on the left, in front of Mike’s Bikes.

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Bikeology Festival

Winter in Edmonton is tough.

All that ice and snow for half the year —

No wonder people love getting outside when June rolls around. June is, not surprisingly, also when the city celebrates Bike Month.

And all month long, you can join in Edmonton’s Bikeology Festival, a love-in for bike culture.

Karly Coleman is a regular on our home station CJSR, and she used to be the bicycle traffic reporter for Terra Informa. She’s one of the organizers of the Bikeology Festival, and she told Terra Informer Chris Chang-Yen Phillips why she thinks it’s so important to have opportunities to make cycling fun in the city.

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Good Living

When we think of a constitution we think of basic “human” rights. We, as humans, have the right to vote, the right to practice religion, the right to own property. But what about nature? Ecuador was the first country in the world to establish the rights of nature at a national level, including it in the 2008 constitution. Terra Informa’s Nicole Wiart talks to Doctor Kelly Swing of the Tiputini biodiversity station in Ecuador about how this constitutional change is great in theory, but in practice, there are a lot of hurdles to still overcome. Nicole Wiart talks to Doctor Kelly Swing.

For more on this story:

Just Sustainabilities

We’ve seen that environmental issues can affect the way people get around, and what they eat. But they don’t affect everyone equally. Julian Agyeman is chair of the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. His research focuses on the intersections between social justice and sustainability, an idea which he terms just sustainability.

For more on this story: 

What’s Happening

Weeding for Wildlife 

An event in Edmonton’s Glory Hills property June 8th and 25th from 8:30am to 3pm; you can volunteer to improve the local habitat for wildlife nesting and feeding, and reduce the spread of invasive plants that displace the native vegetation Bring your gloves and hedge clippers

 To volunteer:

  • Rebeccca at Rebecca@ealt.ca or 780-850-3270

Emissions: A Climate Comedy

Part of Ottawa’s Fringe Festival from June 22 – 29, this comedy is an intelligent satire about the human dynamics behind climate change, and will explore what it is that makes us pee in our own swimming pool.

For more information:

NEERLS (National Environmental, Energy and Resources Law Summit):

A call out to listeners living up north, it’s the annual national environmental, energy, and resources law summit: natural resource and energy legal developments: north and south of 60. A bit of a mouthful, but if you happen to be in Yellowknife on the 20th and 21st of June and are interested in law and the environment, then this summit is made for you. With Canada’s economy increasingly revolving around extraction of natural resources, the need for legal advice is also increasing. The summit will focus on dealing with environmental matters, developing renewable energy generation projects, and learning how to consult with Aboriginal groups.

To register and find out more, head to the NEERLS website: 

Run for Biodiversity:

And in Vancouver, people are running “wild” for farmers and food. Everyone is invited to participate in Vancouver’s Run (or walk, if you are anything like me) for biodiversity on Sunday June 23. The fun and healthy fundraising project is in support of seed-saving farmers in Nepal. The Run for Biodiversity is hoping to raise $5000 to send to environmental initiatives in Nepal, and you can help them get there.

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