Breakthroughs and Setbacks

This week on Terra Informa, a breakthrough in saving wildlife, and a setback for boosting green energy. Matt Hirji explains how 80’s rock has helped one researcher trying to bring back disappearing seabirds called petrels. Then, Chris Chang-Yen Phillips and Alyssa Hindle explain how Ontario’s Green Energy Act helped an engineer in Windsor start manufacturing solar panels after he lost his job with Ford, and why the province is being forced to scrap that part of the law.

Two men install solar panels on a sunny roof.

Windsors Unconquered Sun is one the solar panel manufacturing companies that have benefited from the Green Energy Act. (Photo: Unconquered Sun)

Download this week’s episode

Who has the power in Ontario’s green energy industry?

If you were to ask most Canadians if they wanted more renewable power being built in their province, they’d say yes. And if you asked them whether they’d like to get some local jobs out of the deal, they’d probably say why not. Sometimes, though, people in Canada aren’t the only ones who get a say in what happens here. The World Trade Organization recently forced Ontario to change legislation that required some domestic production for new renewable power projects. Chris Chang-Yen Phillips and Alyssa Hindle have this story about one of the ways we’ve given up our decision-making power, and what we’re getting out of the bargain.

More information on this story:

Aleutian Seabirds

This next story is little ditty about a seabird in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. The petrel is a bird that spends its entire life at sea, only landing on remote islands to copulate. But, things have gone from bad to worse for this seabird in recent years and many biologists are hatching up ideas to help the petrel population survive in an era of marked by climate change and overfishing. Some of these ideas even have 80s rockers tapping their toes and thinking about our responsibility to protect the world’s most vulnerable ecosystems. Matt Hirji talked to Rachel Buxton about her research into the area.

More information on this story:

Advertisements

Join the discussion

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s