Palaeobotany and Permaculture

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Plant lovers unite! This week we’ll be talking Permaculture (a social movement disguised as gardening) with Kaz Haykowsky and Marcin Makarewicz, two of the founders of the Edmonton business, Spruce Permaculture. Then, we’ll be going back in time to talk about ancient plant fossils with Dr. Eva Koppelhus from the University of Alberta.

Download episode here.

Permaculture

What is this permaculture? Gardening design principles, an international social movement, eco-philosophy, or all of the above? Permaculture can be hard to pin down and the term has grown almost as many interpretations as there are practitioners.

Coined in the 1970’s by two Australians – David Holmgren and Bill Mollison – Permaculture was initially a contraction of permanent agriculture and has also come to mean permanent culture. The dual meaning of the word is fitting, as any hope of a permanent culture depends on a permanent food supply!

Kaz Haykowsky and Marcin Makarewicz are two students soon to graduate from the University of Alberta who have just started a ‘Food Not Lawns’ business: Spruce Permaculture. Dylan Hall and Whitney Caine spoke with them about their personal interpretations of Permaculture.

If you are interested in Spruce Permaculture – Check out their website!

Paleobotany

If you were to casually mention Paleobotany in a casual conversation, you’d probably get a “paleo-what-now??” 

Basically, it’s the study of plant fossils. You can also get a little more crazy and talk about palynology, the study of plant spore fossils.

Dr. Eva Koppelhus, a professor of paleobotany at the University of Alberta, thinks the subject is underrated and at least deserves some of the glory that dinosaurs receive.

Here Tasmia Nishat talks with Dr. Koppelhus about the finer points of plant fossils, and why they’re super cool.

Psst: Dr. Koppelhus’ lab is looking for volunteers. If you’re interested, you can email ebk@ualberta.ca for more information.

Program Log- April 24 Permaculture and Paleobotany

Credit to Tasmia Nishat for the photo. 

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