Archive Show

A repeat broadcast of an earlier episode, or part of an earlier episode.

Tuning in to Haida Gwaii

haida

Cox Island in the Haida Gwaii’s, with a red ship sailing through the waters at its shore.

This week on Terra Informa, we’ll hear two stories about Haida Gwaii; one about a non-profit working to bring renewable energy to the community and another about the man behind cutting down the sacred Golden Spruce.

Renewable Energy for Remote Communities

If you live in the city, try to think back to the last time you flipped a light switch and nothing turned on. Now, imagine depending on a plane full of diesel to come into town before you get power back on again! If you live in a remote community in Canada today, this is likely the energy system you rely on. For you, moving towards a more local renewable energy system is about more than just climate issues.

In an interview we originally broadcast in 2012, Chris Chang-Yen Phillips speaks to Alia Lamaadar , the former CEO for Cleantech Community Gateway. We’ll learn about Cleantech Community Gateway, a non-profit working to help the communities of Haida Gwaii build a new energy system.

Hadwin’s Judgement

If you were living in British Columbia in 1997, you may remember the story about forest engineer Grant Hadwin and the Kiidk’yaas or Golden Spruce.

It was a rare Sitka spruce tree that grew along the Yakoun River. Its glowing golden needles sparkling against the lush green forest. Regarded as sacred to the Haida Nation, the tree met a tragic and completely surprising fate. Hadwin cut down the Kiidk’yaas in protest against the logging industry.

Hadwin confessed to his horrific act and was summoned to court, but failed to appear. In fact, Hadwin has been missing since February 14, 1997 and is presumed dead. But his story lives on and the symbol of the Golden Spruce has evolved. An award-winning book called The Golden Spruce by John Vaillant has now inspired a documentary film called Hadwin’s Judgement, directed by British filmmaker Sasha Snow.

Natalee Rawat spoke to the two before the film’s debut at Toronto’s Hot Docs film festival.

Download program log now.

Photo by Stef Olcen

 

Edmonton’s Secret Orchid Collection and Fungus “Pesticides”

orchid

Photo of yellow and magenta orchids that could be a member of the extensive orchid collection at the Muttart Conservatory in Edmonton. Credit to JP Shen.

This week on Terra Informa, we discuss the orchid collection at Edmonton’s own Muttart Conservatory and learn how fungi can be used as more than just “fun guys” in your garden or farm.

Download episode now.

Orchids in Edmonton

Most citizens of Edmonton are aware of the Muttart Conservatory, but not a lot of them know about the ginormous orchid collection that resides there. You may know orchids as that overly fancy flower stores sometimes sell. Or as something you put in baked goods at times, because fun fact: vanilla is an orchid. How did this collection come to be? And what’s up with orchids, anyway — why do people care enough to form an entire society around them?

Tasmia Nishat speaks with Dave Nixon of the Orchid Species Preservation Foundation, or OSPF for short, to get to the bottom of this. Plant nerds, this ones for you!

Fungus Pesticides

Rebecca Rooney talks to Sunita Rajput, a University of Alberta researcher who conducted research on ways that farmers can use fungus in place of conventional insecticides.

Grant McEwan Bee Tours

Download program log now.

Photo by JP Shen

 

ONCE-IN-A-LIFETIME EVENTS

Agave Bloom

Photo by Joaquim Alves Gaspar

This week, Terra Informer Chris Chang-Yen Phillips ventured to Edmonton’s Muttart Conservatory to learn about a truly once-in-a-lifetime event: the blooming of the agave, an ephemeral plant that only blooms once before it dies. We also look at the decreasing rarity of once-in-a-lifetime storms with Terra Informer Jessica Kozlowski, as well as the truly amazing experience of a life-changing flood described firsthand by Terra Informer Natalee Rawat.

Download episode here.

The Bittersweet Life Cycle of the Agave Plant

A few years back, Terra Informa’s Chris Chang-Yen Phillips headed to Edmonton’s Muttart Conservatory in pursuit of a once-in-a-lifetime story. The Muttart houses exotic plants under its pyramids all year long, but he was there to see one particular plant: an agave. It only blooms once before it dies. Chris spoke to the Muttart’s Jade Dodd, and Brandi Eide, who manages the succulent collection at Arizona’s Desert Botanical Garden.

Ecobabble: The Science of Extreme Storms

What happens when once-in-a-lifetime storms shift to becoming the norm? Terra Informer Jessica Kozlowski discusses the ever-increasing imbalance of large-scale climatic events and why massive natural disasters are becoming more frequent.

A Flood of the Century: the 2005 Maharashtra Floods

In this piece from the Terra Informa archives, Natalee Rawat experienced a real Flood of the Century and lived to tell. In 2005, almost 1 meter of rain fell on the Indian state of Maharashtra on a single summer day. The city shut down completely, and the deluge caused at least 5,000 deaths, and cost 100 million USD. Natalee sat down with Ali Sultani to recall the events of July 26, 2005.

Headlines

Big cats of today are under the same threat as extinct Ice Age cats

A 2017 University of Sussex study identified that the African lion and the Sunda clouded leopard are facing the same extinction threats as the big felines of the ice age. The study determined that during the last ice age a lack of prey was the primary factor in the extinction of the 7 big cats. Read the study here

Enbridge commits to greater disclosure on Indigenous and environmental issues

The Calgary-based natural gas company has declared that they will increase disclosure of factors that go into determining indigenous and environmental issues when making acquisitions. This was decided despite two- thirds of Enbridge shareholders voting against it on May 11. Chief executive Al Monaco states that “We thought, and still do, that the idea of providing more information on our approach to investments and acquisitions was a very good one”, adding that the company would add the information to its corporate social responsibility reporting as an effort to be more transparent. Read the full article here

What’s Happening

Fresh MEÆT micro-fundraising event – May 24, 2017

Fresh MEÆT is a micro-fundraising event hosted by Edmonton’s NextGen in support of local food and urban agriculture initiatives with 7 presenters pitching their best project ideas. Attendees will get to vote for the idea they believe should get the funding. If you are sitting on a great food and urban agriculture project idea of your own, you can submit your own pitch by May 22nd for a chance to present at the event and win prizes!

The event will occur from 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm at the ATB Entrepreneur Centre Edmonton, 4234 Calgary Trail Northwest Edmonton, Alberta.

Tickets are $15, with $10 of each ticket going towards the winning initiative. Purchase tickets here

Download Program log here.

The Politics of Science

Art Poskanzer

Photo by Art Poskanzer

This week on Terra Informa Lauren Carter spoke with Kate Gibbs, the Executive Director of Evidence for Democracy, about a report she co-authored that surveyed over 400 government scientists about their funding capacity, their freedom to communicate their research, and the outsourcing of government research to external non-Ministry professionals. Then we go to the archives of Science Faction where they discuss three possible ways the world could end.

Download episode now.

Oversight at Risk: The State of Government Science in British Columbia

Is B.C. governmental science well-funded and openly communicated? We interviewed Katie Gibbs, the Executive Director of Evidence for Democracy to give us the run-down. The report surveyed over 400 government scientists about their funding capacity, their freedom to communicate their research and the outsourcing of government research to external professionals. We also asked her about the March for Science that she spoke at on March 22, 2017.

Science Faction: The End

“The End” of Science Faction has arrived! For our 8th and final show, hear from three great Canadian researchers, planetary scientist Dr. Alan Hildebrand, immunologist Dr. Matthew Miller, and climate champion Merran Smith, talk about three possible ways the world could end and how we can avoid TEOTWAWKI (a.k.a. the end of the world as we know it).

What’s Happening

Women in Renewable Energy Networking Meetup- May 8th 2017

Calling all women interested in Renewable Energy! On May 8th, there will be a networking meetup for the new Edmonton Chapter of the organization WiRE, or Women In Renewable Energy. This discussion will focus on building networks for jobs and roles in the renewable energy sector.  All women working in a field related to renewable energy are invited, as are students and developing professionals who are looking for perspectives on joining the renewable energy sector. This event is for women only.

The Guest speaker at this event will be Brandy J. Burdeniuk, an industrial designer, entrepreneur, and founding partner of EcoAmmo Sustainable Consulting, a green building consulting firm.

This event is free to attend, and will be at the Mosaic Centre (Alberta’s First net-zero commercial Building) 2003 91 St SW, Edmonton, AB T6X 1A2. For more information, please check out WiRE’s information page

University of Alberta School of Business, Energy, and Environment– discussing Alberta’s new carbon tax- May 18 2017

Then, for those of you who want to know what’s going on inside the minds of oil and gas business leaders: On May 18th, the University of Alberta School of Business, Energy, and Environment will be hosting an event to discuss the effect Alberta’s new carbon tax will have on business. The Carbon Tax was implemented with the goal of providing financial incentives for businesses and households to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Speakers will include:
Stephen Clark, the Chief Financial Officer of Mullen Group, an oil and gas wells drilling company;
Cam Mitchell, the Vice President in Data Analysis and Forecasting for Solution 105, an energy management consulting company;
Jeju Varghese, the Director of Canadian Operations for Rig Systems, with National Oilwell Varco, a multinational oil corporation based out of Houston Texas.

The event will be moderated by Andrew Leach, an Assistant Professor at the University of Alberta School of Business

The event will occur from 4:30pm to 6:30pm at The Matrix Hotel, 10640 100 Ave NW
Edmonton, Alberta

The cost is $30 per person.
Please RSVP by May 15, 2017.

Download program log now.

There is no Planet B

Earthrise

This week we explore the origins of Earth Day with an ecobabble that spans the decades from 1970 to the March for Science of 2017. Next, we’re revisiting an interview with Chris Hadfield from our archives.

 

Download episode now.

Earth Day: Cause For Protest or Celebration?

Lauren Carter and Dylan Hall hit the streets to find out what the public thinks about Earth Day and the March for Science. You’ll be hearing some of those interviews throughout this ecobabble on the origins of Earth Day.  Earth Day began as the environmentalist movement was making its voice heard with protests and educational teach-ins. Today, Earth Day is celebrated across the planet, although its focus has largely turned from political issues to small-scale individual action. Find out how this transition happened, and how the March for Science is changing that with this ecobabble produced by Lauren Carter.

Chris Hadfield Interview From 2013

Most of us will never know what it’s like being in space. We’ve all seen the pictures of that familiar glowing green and blue orb from the viewpoint of a spaceship. We have rich imaginations and age-long fascinations of what could be out there beyond the sky. But what does it smell like? What does it really feel like to be out there? From the 2013 archives, our own Matt Hirji talked to Commander Chris Hadfield about questions like these.

Download program log now.

Photo by NASA

Sustainability Inspiration Wherever You Go

 

Sunshine_at_Dunstanburgh

You can find sustainability inspiration wherever you go. This episode looks at bioremediation as a sustainable alternative for cleaning up oil spills and heavy metals. We also look at sustainability initiatives in two schools in Alberta.

 

Download episode now.

The Ability to Inspire

Think back to a time when you were in school (you might even be a student right now!). How much did you know about sustainability? Did you know what the phrase meant? Did you care? Right now, sustainability education is becoming more and more prevalent in schools, but we still have a long way to go. Listen in this week as Nicole Richard and Paula Daza explore the ways that teachers and students in Edmonton are working on making their schools more sustainable.

At the time of original airing, Nicole and Paula were students at the University of Alberta,  incorporating community service and community learning into their degrees. To learn more about their project We the Future, click here.

Leila Darwish on Bioremediation

In a time when spills, leaks, and environmental disasters are becoming more and more common, how do we clean up in a way that’s both reasonable and responsible? Prevention, of course, is always the best policy, but even the best laid plans go awry, and when they do, one answer is often overlooked: bioremediation. Tasmia Nishat speaks with Leila Darwish, author of Earth Repair, about the healing potential of sunflowers and oyster mushrooms backyard contamination, big spills, and everything in between.

Leila Darwish is also a founding member of Terra Informa and at the time of original airing was the Council of Canadians’ Pacific regional organizer. You can read her blog here.

Headlines

If you would like to learn more about any of the headlines you heard, please click the links below.

Evidence For Democracy Report on B.C. Government Science Confidentiality

Edmonton Farmer Fundraises to Conserve Land for Community Agriculture; Donate here

Download program log now.

Photo by Christopher Down.

The Re-Re-Re-Return of Misinforma

 

Terra Informa Photo May 29 Taiga

Fake news! Trump’s Green House! Eco-amnesia: the terrifying new condition that’s gripping the nation! Terra Misinforma is back (again!) for an April Fool’s celebration. As well, from an archive, we ask the questions that are too controversial for you to ask yourself—like what to do with Iceland? Do we really need water? Plus a special investigative feature on Canada’s radical, extremist environmentalists.

Download episode now.

National Headlines

Were you upset when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that he plans to revoke the transit tax credit? Well, good news! Listen to hear Trudeau’s newest reasonable proposals to help out transit-riders that may be considering a change in their commute. Additionally, Parks Canada has a new idea to boost tourism.

Trumps Corner: Newest Executive Orders

Think Donald Trump only cares about locker room talk and private email servers? Think again! We discuss Trump’s latest environmental policies, including new plans for the military budget, a fresh way to protect National Parks, and a policy aimed at lowering carbon emissions.

Ecobabble: Environmental Amnesia- A Troubling Disorder

This week we discuss Environmental Amnesia with world-renowned neuroscientist and psychologist, Dr. Lafaque. Learn more about this concerning condition that affects millions of people everyday, and if we are getting any closer to finding a cure.

Reflections on Water: A Debate

What’s water really good for besides hockey, hosing down activists, and raining on parades? As far as natural resources go, water’s just a drop in the bucket, and we’ve decided to wash our hands of it. But unlike most media outlets, we try to get you both sides of every story, even if the other is patently wrong. So, to stand up for the big blue—or green, or whatever colour gets you hippies out of bed these days—eco-conscious Canadian Nelly von Hoser joined us in studio for a short and shallow conservation—errr—conversation on the merits of water.

Spawns of Seitan: Canada’s Terrifying Ecoterrorists

You hear news on Terra Misinforma all the time about the misguided misdeeds of Canada’s environmentalists. Fortunately, our great government is starting to catch on. In recent years, politicians, pundits and police have all identified environmentalists as the leading threat to the nation. To tell us more, we’ve got Trevor Chow-Fraser, who went undercover in his fight to remain vigilant against domestic extremism in the name of environmentalism.

What’s Pissed Off Chris

Terra Misinforma’s regular shock columnist Chris Chang-Yen Phillips has an idea he’d like to get off his chest. It’s about a certain Scandinavian nation that’s become a hot tourist destination for those in search of a union of lava fields and icy slopes.

Download program log now.

Farmtastic Food and Amazing Animals

TerraINfomraPhoto

This week on Terra Informa, we discuss what makes an animal a pet and what makes them food, what makes a free range egg, and opportunities abroad beyond simply propagating the English language.

Download episode here.

Farm and the Country

Many young people in the English-speaking world choose to travel abroad and teach English in a foreign country. However, the enriching experience of extended cultural travel does not have to be restricted to the realm of teaching English. Terra Informa’s Miro Radovic sat down with young Edmontonian Nicholas Mickelsen to discuss a program that enabled him to spend almost a year on an organic farm in Europe as a WWOOFer with the World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms network.

Pet vs Food

About this time back in 2013 Terra Informer Nicole Wiart talked to Alberta Micro Pigs’ Angela Hardy and Irvings Farm Fresh’s Nicola Irving. The two of them both raise and breed pigs in the Edmonton area, one for food… the other for pets. Throughout the interviews, Nicole noticed strange similarities between both women and the way they viewed the pigs, despite raising, breeding, and feeding them for incredibly different purposes.

Ecobabble: What does it mean to be a free range egg?

Scrambled, poached, sunny side up. Whether they came before the chicken, or the chicken before them, eggs are a breakfast staple. Terra Informa’s Nicole Wiart brings us an EcoBabble – where she enlists some local farmers to try to break down the term “free range.” It’s just one of the many terms that you can find on a carton of eggs – but as you’ll soon find out, defining free range is not as simple as it sounds.

Download program log here.

Photo by: Zach Baranowski Flickr here.