Archive Show

A repeat broadcast of an earlier episode, or part of an earlier episode.

Myrtle and Charlie Ed, Revisited

 

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Photo Credit: torange

This week on Terra Informa, we return to “The Ballad of Myrtle and Charlie Ed”, a documentary from our archives, presented by Anthony Goertz. This is a story about discovering a story – one filled with charm, heart, and a great elephant escape!

Headlines cover Canada’s reception at COP24, Chinese internment of Uyghurs and Muslims in East Turkistan, and new research on cooperative bat behaviour. 

Download episode now.

Canada at COP24

Last month, in Katowice, Canada was being called out at COP 24called out at COP 24 in Poland to step up and fill a leadership void in climate talks at the conference.  Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, assures that the Paris targets will be met, but has not yet announced a plan that would come close to doubling emissions cuts, as required to keep warming to one and a half degrees Celsius, as outlined necessary by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report.

Chinese interment of Uyghurs over mineral resources

In East Asia, China continues its crackdown on Uyghurs  and Muslims in East Turkistan, forcing over a million people into internment camps and prisons. Detention of East Turkish citizens secures this mineral-rich region for the Chinese state. Competition for mineral resources is increasing, with resource extraction used to justify the degradation of the environment and genocide of people in poorer nations by those with wealth.

At Terra Informa, environmental issues are social justice issues.  Raw wealth feeds wealthy countries and fuels their greenhouse gas emissions. Poor countries end up the least able to adapt to climate impacts like floods and droughts, both because they don’t have the money, and because their degraded ecosystems are less resistant to change.

News on bats!

In news on bats: a new study shows how, in the face of food unpredictability, a number of species of bats will forage cooperatively in social groups. When food sources are predictable bats forage and eat alone as other bats may pose a threat to the individual bat’s access to food. But in cases of social foraging, bats actively help each other find food sources.

Edward Hurme, a UMD biological sciences graduate student in Maryland Biology Professor Gerald Wilkinson’s laboratory says that the next steps for this research are to look into what strategies are utilized by the bats, whether bats prefer to follow other bats of their own species, and if they can differentiate between individuals or not.

Download program log here.

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Winter Cycling & Christmas Tree Debacles

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This week we bring you two wintry archives! First a debate: which is more sustainable? An artificial or a real Christmas tree? Carson Fong finds out! Then winter cycling – sounds scary? Turns out it might not be as awful as it sounds.

Download episode now.

Headlines

The Calgary Board of Education and Bullfrog Power have teamed up to fund ‘Good Day Sunshine’, a recently announced initiative to install five new solar PV systems on Calgary elementary schools. [click here]

Environment and Parks Minister Shannon Phillips announced at the University of Alberta last week that the Alberta Youth Climate Action Council is now live and taking applications for youth aged 18-26 interested in giving feedback on climate change issues across the province. [click here]

A pilot study conducted by Texas State University and Bat Conservation International test-drove some new technology that reduces bat mortality from wind turbines by up to 54%! [click here]

Winter cycling

We take a trip down memory lane and revisit Terra Informers Carson and Trevor’s interview the president of the Winter Cycling Federation, Timo Perälä. Timo’s advice on navigating the mental blocks of winter cycling is perfectly timed with our snowy streets and recently expanded bike network.   

Which is greener?

In another archive, Terra Informer Hamdi explores the environmental debate between artificial and real Christmas trees, and how each stacks up in terms of contributing to climate change.

What’s happening

If you’re celebrating the holidays in the Edmonton area, come visit the U of A Forestry tree sale in the Corbett Hall parking lot near the University of Alberta hospital. Some friendly U of A Foresters will be there to greet you Monday to Friday from 3pm to 9pm and Saturday/Sunday from 9am to 9pm until December 21 or until the trees sell out. 10% of proceeds are donated to the United Way. [click here]

Download program log here.

Photo by: Martin Reis

Sassy Bats and Boss Moss

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Photo Credit to Dasha Gaian (Flickr)

This week on Terra Informa, we get batty for Calgary Bat Week with an archive discussing the challenges faced by our flying furry friends, plus we re-air an interview with Edmonton’s resident Moss Man, Dr. René Bellend, about the boss that is moss!

Living with Bats

In the spring of 2017, Terra Informers Lauren, Charly, and Amanda attended an event called “Living With Bats”, put on by the Alberta Community Bat Program. The group of Terra Informers spoke with Erin Lowe of the Alberta Community Bat Program, and asked her about general bat info, how to attract bats to your neighbourhood, and to highlight some of the challenges being faced by bats today. 

Moss Mysteries

Let it not be said that that green fuzzy stuff you see around is less fascinating that other, more impressively plumed species of flora. Our second archive piece from March 2015 puts the spotlight on moss, the sometimes-unsung hero for many nature enthusiasts. Terra Informer Tasmia Nishat spoke with Edmonton’s own “Moss Man,” Dr. René Bellend, a professor in the department of Renewable Resources at the University of Alberta.  They chat about why Dr. Bellend is so passionate about these plants, and why it can be legally difficult to protect rare mosses.

What’s Happening

If you live in the Edmonton area, there’s a free documentary screening happening on Thursday, November 1st at the Princess Theatre. “Human Flow” is the title of a documentary by internationally-renowned artist Ai Weiwei that captures images of the astounding, and often tragic, journeys of human migration across the world fuelled by famine, war, and climate change. Doctors without Borders are hosting the event, and will lead a discussion before the film about the many challenges that people face when forced to leave the place they called home. RSVP via Eventbrite.

Trailer:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVZGyTdk_BY&feature=youtu.be

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/film-screening-human-flow-registration-50874855061?aff=efbeventtix&fbclid=IwAR356zH-dyZqtJY5_yx1IhM3KAm0Ym7rbwzaX6ZhxnOQMv7hFbmVTxMZA-k

Download program log here.

Inside the IPCC with Debra Robertson

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Photo by: The Conversation

This week on Terra Informa, we look back at the past two weeks of climate change news with the release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change ’s most recent “Special Report,” which discusses the impacts of an increased mean global temperature of 1.5 degrees Celsius. We follow this with an archived interview with an IPCC working group co-chair from last March when we covered the panel’s cities and climate change conference here in Edmonton.

Download episode now. 

A Conversation with IPCC Co-Chair Debra Robertson

To provide us with some insight into the IPCC, how it works and what challenges the panel faces, this week we bring you an interview from March 2018 when we covered the IPCC conference on Cities and Climate Change. Terra Informer Dylan Hall speaks with Debra Roberts, Co-Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s second working group, titled ‘Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability’. The two discuss the IPCC as an organization, bridging science and practice, the importance of informality, and encouraging activism.

Resources from this week’s episode:

Trudeau Government Urged to Step Up Climate Action In Emergency Debate [click here]

Transcribed Notes of the Emergency House of Commons Debate [click here]

IPCC Special Report [click here]

Download program log.

Advice from Buffy Sainte-Marie

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This week on Terra Informa, we hear some of Buffy Sainte-Marie’s advice for young people – words of wisdom for young activists, how music can be an expression of play, and how creativity is a connection to the Creator. Terra Informer Sydney Karbonik and three of her friends get to choose one question each to ask Sainte-Marie at the Edmonton Folk Fest this past summer.

Then we get to dig into the archives and hear from Eriel Derange, an indigenous rights advocate and a member of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation. Deranger highlights the climate crises faced by Indigenous peoples of Alberta and the moral and legal obligation of governments to work with Indigenous peoples in building progressive and aggressive climate change solutions.

Download episode now. 

Headlines

On the evening of Tuesday, October 9th, a natural gas pipeline operated by Enbridge ruptured, starting a large fire just north of Prince George, BC. [click here]

A massive oil refinery explosion, operated by Irving Oil, has caused a thick black smoke to cover the east side of the Saint John’s, NB. [click here]

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Revisiting Mary Schäffer (plus Alberta Climate Week events)

Mary Schaffer

This week, we’re revisiting an archive interview about naturalist, photographer, writer, and artist Mary Schäffer. In this piece, originally aired in January, Terra Informers Amanda Rooney and Sofia Osborne talked to University of Alberta photography historian and professor Dr. Colleen Skidmore about her latest book Finding Mary Schäffer: Women, Wilderness, Photgraphy. 

We’re also bringing you lots of information about upcoming environmental events in Alberta, including the Alberta Climate Summit and related events across the province. So tune in to find out what’s happening!

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Photo by Mary Schäffer

 

Sustainability in Classrooms and Constitutions

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That bite in the September autumn air is a tell-tale sign of back to school. This week, we dug into our archives and uncovered a 2016 piece about sustainability in Alberta schools, as well as another archive that helps us consider the pros and cons of including the environment in national constitutions.

Download episode now. 

Sustainability in Alberta Classrooms

Right now, sustainability education is becoming more and more prevalent in schools, but we still have a long way to go. In 2016, Nicole Richard and Paula Daza spoke with the teachers of Brightview Elementary School and the students of the Sustainability Club from Cochrane High School about how students can be inspired by sustainability and environment-focused education. Nicole and Paula, students from the University of Alberta, incorporated this type of community engagement into their degrees through their project called We the Future.

Good Living

When we think of a constitution we think of basic “human” rights. We, as humans, have the right to vote, the right to practice religion, the right to own property. But what about nature? Ecuador was the first country in the world to establish the rights of nature at a national level, including it in the 2008 constitution. Terra Informa’s Nicole Wiart talks to Doctor Kelly Swing of the Tiputini biodiversity station in Ecuador about how this constitutional change is great in theory, but in practice, there are a lot of hurdles to still overcome. Nicole Wiart talks to Doctor Kelly Swing.

This Week’s Headlines

St. Albert to Destroy Invasive Koi (CBC) – Click here

Meetings between Alberta Premier Rachel Notley and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Over the Trans Mountain Pipeline (CBC) – Click here

Smart Traffic Lights in Ottawa (National Observer) – Click here

Download program log here.

Putting the ECO in the Economy

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Last week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau removed ‘climate change’ from the name of the ‘Environment, Climate Change and Energy’ cabinet committee, renaming it the ‘Environment and Clean Growth’ committee. So we went to our archives to unearth a piece that looks at the how the environment and economy interact. David Suzuki and Jeff Rubin talked to Terra Informer Hamdi Assawi in 2012 when they were touring Rubin’s book “The End of Growth”.

Download episode here.

Download program log.

Photo by: Daniel Hoherd