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The Role of Municipalities in Climate Adaptation

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This week we’re reairing an episode from our archives! This past June Amanda Rooney and Charly Blais sat down with Danielle Koleyak, an environmental project manager with the city of Edmonton. We talked about how municipalities are taking leadership in climate mitigation while also making strides for adaptation. We also spoke with Danielle about Edmonton’s newly developing climate change adaptation and resilience strategy and about the power that local leaders and municipalities have in addressing climate change issues.

Since then it has been announced that the City of Edmonton will be hosting the inaugural  Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cities and Climate Change Science conference in March 2018. For more information click here.

Download episode now. 

What’s Happening

International Mountain Day

Canadian Mountain Network is hosting a Mountain Festival in celebration of International Mountain Day. There will be a number of fascinating and free events! Highlights include: Wade Davis, the Keynote speaker at the festival, speaking  about his book “Into The Silence: The Great War, Mallory, and the Conquest of Everest”,  a panel discussion on biodiversity, contaminants, and Indigenous food security in mountain places, and a talk given by photo historian and University of Alberta Professor Colleen Skidmore on her new book “Searching for Mary Schäffer: Women Wilderness Photography”. 

Change for Climate Talks

On Thursday, December 7, the City of Edmonton is hosting the Change for Climate Talks, an event to inspire Edmontonians into climate action. The event at the Art Gallery of Alberta will feature 11 speakers who will each get 7 minutes to talk about a climate-change related topic. The speakers include Edmonton’s poet laureate Ahmed (Knowmadic) Ali, Anna Ho from Paths for People, and Edmonton’s historian laureate Chris Chang-Yen Phillips.

Download program log here. 

Photo by: EROVIKOVA FOTO

 

 

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Environmentally Themed Music: The Moulettes

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This week Terra Informer, Charlotte Thomasson, got in touch with UK rock band The Moulettes.  Formed in 2002, the band’s latest album, Preternatural, has taken on an environmental theme. Charlotte spoke with celloist Hannah Miller about the inspiration for Preternatural, as well as coral reefs, Bjork, and inspiring the masses to take on big issues!

Download episode now. 

Download program log here. 

Photo by Linus Nylund on Unsplash

Preventing Grizzly Deaths on Canada’s Railway Tracks

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Over the past fifteen years, there’s been a big spike in the number of Grizzly Bears in Banff National Park being killed by one surprising force: trains. We spoke with University of Alberta professor, Dr. Colleen Cassady St. Clair, and researcher Jonathan Backs, about their five year study into why this is happening, and how they are working to get the grizzly bear population back ~on track~

Stay tuned for our upcoming fundrive episode! If you tune in live to CJSR 88.5 fm and call in to donate you will be entered to win a number of cool prizes. Support community radio and keep our communities vibrant!

Download episode now. 

Download program log here. 

Photo by: Roderick Eime on flickr

Riding the Trans Canada Trail

 

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Photo by Edmund Aunger in Cochrane, Alberta on the Trans Canada Trail

After spending the last two years on the Trans Canada Trail, Sarah Jackson is set to become the first woman on record to complete the 11,500 km hike.

This week, we have a story about the Trans Canada Trail. We have an interview with Edmund Aunger, a cyclist with a petition to make the Trans Canada Trail safer, and we have a follow-up interview with Paul Labarge, Chairman of the Board of the Trans Canada Trail Organization to get his perspective.

Download the episode.

What’s Happening

Deadline set for Canada to improve an Albertan National Park

The United Nations has given Canada 9 months to outline a plan intended to improve the health of the country’s largest national park, Wood Buffalo National Park, or risk having the park added to the UN’s list of endangered world heritage sites.The park is home to one of the world’s last self-regulating bison herds and the only remaining nesting ground for the endangered whooping crane. Read more here. 

Same-sex vulture couple hatch abandoned egg

A monogamous pair of male griffon vultures at the Artis Amsterdam Royal Zoo in the Netherlands have successfully hatched an abandoned egg after zookeeper Job van Tol noticed the egg on the zoo’s aviary floor. Van Tol reports that the vulture couple are working together to protect and feed their adopted offspring and the chick appears to be doing fantastically. Read more here. 

International solar SUN-day

This Sunday, the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada and the Charlie Bates Solar Astronomy Project present International Solar SUN-day at Hawrelak Park, an international effort being held in more than 20 countries around the world, celebrating the summer solstice weekend. In addition to educating the public on the science of our sun, this free event will have specialized solar telescopes and access to real time solar cameras for safe and stunning views of the Sun. Click here for more information on this event.

Download the program log.

Reflecting on the Fort McMurray Wildfire

This month marks one year since the disastrous Fort McMurray wildfire. In this week’s episode we air an archive about the fire. CJSR volunteers gathered first-hand accounts of people who had to flee and met people who opened up their hearts and wallets to help. Then a University of Alberta wildfire expert provides some analysis of the wildfire.

Download episode now.

This month marks one year since the disastrous Fort McMurray wildfire. In this week’s episode we air an archive about the fire. CJSR volunteers gathered first-hand accounts of people who had to flee and met people who opened up their hearts and wallets to help. Then a University of Alberta wildfire expert provides some analysis of the wildfire.
 Thank you to this week’s contributors from CJSR Radio, Marco Visconti, Skye Hyndman and Pat McIlveen. The show was produced and hosted by Chris Chang-Yen Phillips and Trevor Chow-Fraser.

Download program log now.

Photo by the office of the Premier of Alberta on Flickr.

Sustainability Inspiration Wherever You Go

 

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You can find sustainability inspiration wherever you go. This episode looks at bioremediation as a sustainable alternative for cleaning up oil spills and heavy metals. We also look at sustainability initiatives in two schools in Alberta.

 

Download episode now.

The Ability to Inspire

Think back to a time when you were in school (you might even be a student right now!). How much did you know about sustainability? Did you know what the phrase meant? Did you care? Right now, sustainability education is becoming more and more prevalent in schools, but we still have a long way to go. Listen in this week as Nicole Richard and Paula Daza explore the ways that teachers and students in Edmonton are working on making their schools more sustainable.

At the time of original airing, Nicole and Paula were students at the University of Alberta,  incorporating community service and community learning into their degrees. To learn more about their project We the Future, click here.

Leila Darwish on Bioremediation

In a time when spills, leaks, and environmental disasters are becoming more and more common, how do we clean up in a way that’s both reasonable and responsible? Prevention, of course, is always the best policy, but even the best laid plans go awry, and when they do, one answer is often overlooked: bioremediation. Tasmia Nishat speaks with Leila Darwish, author of Earth Repair, about the healing potential of sunflowers and oyster mushrooms backyard contamination, big spills, and everything in between.

Leila Darwish is also a founding member of Terra Informa and at the time of original airing was the Council of Canadians’ Pacific regional organizer. You can read her blog here.

Headlines

If you would like to learn more about any of the headlines you heard, please click the links below.

Evidence For Democracy Report on B.C. Government Science Confidentiality

Edmonton Farmer Fundraises to Conserve Land for Community Agriculture; Donate here

Download program log now.

Photo by Christopher Down.

Farmtastic Food and Amazing Animals

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This week on Terra Informa, we discuss what makes an animal a pet and what makes them food, what makes a free range egg, and opportunities abroad beyond simply propagating the English language.

Download episode here.

Farm and the Country

Many young people in the English-speaking world choose to travel abroad and teach English in a foreign country. However, the enriching experience of extended cultural travel does not have to be restricted to the realm of teaching English. Terra Informa’s Miro Radovic sat down with young Edmontonian Nicholas Mickelsen to discuss a program that enabled him to spend almost a year on an organic farm in Europe as a WWOOFer with the World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms network.

Pet vs Food

About this time back in 2013 Terra Informer Nicole Wiart talked to Alberta Micro Pigs’ Angela Hardy and Irvings Farm Fresh’s Nicola Irving. The two of them both raise and breed pigs in the Edmonton area, one for food… the other for pets. Throughout the interviews, Nicole noticed strange similarities between both women and the way they viewed the pigs, despite raising, breeding, and feeding them for incredibly different purposes.

Ecobabble: What does it mean to be a free range egg?

Scrambled, poached, sunny side up. Whether they came before the chicken, or the chicken before them, eggs are a breakfast staple. Terra Informa’s Nicole Wiart brings us an EcoBabble – where she enlists some local farmers to try to break down the term “free range.” It’s just one of the many terms that you can find on a carton of eggs – but as you’ll soon find out, defining free range is not as simple as it sounds.

Download program log here.

Photo by: Zach Baranowski Flickr here.

The NEB & the Future of Energy in Canada

 

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This week on Terra Informa, Terra Informer Amanda Rooney chats with Hélène Lauzon, the co-chair on an expert panel set up by the federal government to work on investigating the modernization of the National Energy Board. Then, in an archive, Danielle Dalgoy and Riyah Lakhani catch up with electrical engineer Warren Sarauer from the Solar Energy Society of Alberta to talk about the future of renewables back in November 2014.

Download episode now.

National Energy Board Modernization Expert Panel

About two weeks ago Terra Informer Amanda Rooney spoke with Hélène Lauzon. Ms.Lauzon is the co-chair on an expert panel set up by the federal government to work on investigating how the National Energy Board can be modernized.

The National Energy Board regulates international and interprovincial energy projects such as pipelines, powerlines and energy exports. The 5 person expert panel has been travelling across Canada holding discussions with stakeholders and the public. They have even held separate days especially encouraging the participation of Indigenous individuals and groups. Check out Amanda Rooney and Carter Gorzitza’s story about some of what the board has heard so far.

More info at: http://www.neb-modernization.ca/neb-welcome

Solar power in the neighbourhood?

When you were a kid in school and you first learned about solar power, did you think, why don’t they put those on our roof? Terra Informa’s Danielle Dolgoy thought a lot about solar power growing up under Edmonton’s big, sunny skies. It seemed simple enough. Slap a few panels up on the house and school, and stop polluting the water, air, and soil.

As solar technology has improved over the last decade it is rapidly becoming a viable alternative to burning fossil fuels. And as energy industry heads scramble to maintain their dominance over the delivery of the essential thing: energy, certain myths have begun to creep into the conversation.

Some people say that solar power is too costly to produce and thus, is not a real alternative for the everyday consumer. Others say that the process of manufacturing solar panels, or modules as the professionals call them, is just as hazardous to the environment as conventional electricity generation. So why mess with what we already know? They say we should stick with the reliable energy that we’ve always trusted and continue using the infrastructure in place in the same way we always have.

Danielle caught up with business owner, electrical engineer, and solar power enthusiast Warren Sarauer recently, to bust these myths. After she and Terra Informa’s Riyah Lakhani attended Sarauer’s talk on solar energy hosted by the Solar Energy Society of Alberta, called “Solar Energy: How to Generate Your Own Power and Sell It Back to the Grid”, they both wanted to know more about the viability of solar power for themselves and the people they know.

Download program log now.

Photo by Brian Cantoni.