bikes

Naked Bike Maintenance

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We’re live at Edmonton’s MEC Bike Fest with a two part special all about cycling. This week, we’ll show you how to take good care of your ride, why you should jump on a World Naked Bike Ride, and what’s going on across Canada for Bike Month.

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Taking Care of Your Bike

Chris Chan from Edmonton Bicycle Commuters gives some tips on basic bicycle maintenance, and shares the one thing that he finds himself neglecting on his own bike.

World Naked Bike Ride

It’s a day when people just ride their bikes—naked. Why? We find out when Tasmia Nishat speaks with Julie of World Naked Bike Ride Edmonton.

Update: Due to weather, the World Naked Bike Ride event in Edmonton date has been changed to Saturday, July 4th.

Bike Month Across Canada

Halifax

Sudbury

First Annual Rayside Balfour Bike Rodeo

Toronto

Toronto’s Bike to Work Day began in 1989 and is now one of the largest events of its kind throughout North America.

Toronto, Mississauga, York region and Hamilton

Bike Month

@BikeMonth on Twitter

Hamilton

Carbon Cycle Lake-to-Lake overnight bicycle trip from Lake Ontario to Lake Erie.

Ottawa

Bike To Work Ottawa

Belleville

Pedal Palooza

Winnipeg

Bike Week Winnipeg

Vancouver

Ride the Road hands-on course

Edmonton

Bikeology: Bikey Breakfast

Out for an early morning ride? Going to work or school or practice? Woke up early and are pondering possibilities? Have a gap in your schedule between 7 – 9 a.m.? Check out to our Bikey Breakfasts where you can find tasty food and beverages provided by local restaurants, information about cycling in Edmonton, a listing of all the events happening during Bike Month, AND have your bicycle checked by one of our cheery mechanics.

Bikeology: Foodie Fridays

We recognize that some folks just don’t have time to stop… they wanna get where they are going and we might want to go with them! So we created Foodie Fridays with the intent of gathering hordes of cyclists, riding to one or several restaurants every Friday ALL DAY (or for the major meal portions) and then #yegbike -ing the heck out of the ride, the resto, the meal, and the groovy time had by all…EVERY Friday in June!

Bikeology: Commuter Challenge Race

Held during the Commuter Challenge, this race demonstrates the efficiency of various modes of transportation. It’s a friendly competition where we invite participants (including you!) to use various transportation modes (bus, car, bicycle, skateboard, walking/jogging, roller blading, camel) to make their way from a starting location to a finish line in downtown Edmonton. We have developed a highly scientific bagel unit of energy to determine the efficiency of your transportation choice. And, of course, bagels are part of the light breakfast you can look forward to at the finish line.

Bikeology: Mocktails on the Bridge

If early mornings aren’t your stchick and coffee not a draw, then drop by the Handle Bar at the High Level Bridge for a pedal-powered smoothie and a chance to catch up on local goings-on in the bikey world.

Bikeology: Outdoor Ride-In Movie

A simple concept really, it’s a drive-in movie for bicycles, powered by bicycles. The movie is often preceded by music, until it’s dark enough to see the screen (I know, hey?). Bring your own snacks, mozzie repellant, blankets, and something warm and dry to sit on. If you have any suggestions for what bikey film you’d like to see, tell us!

BikeWriters’ Nights

Wax poetic about your ride! The Bikewriters’ Nights take place at Mike’s Bikes and Beans, where our host Mike makes his living ensuring Edmontonians have access to bicycles by either selling bicycles or fixing bicycles. And when he’s not fixing, or out riding, he’s writing! Join the Bikeology Gears and Mike whilst they wax lyric about their favourite object – the bicycle. And Mike makes a mean coffee, just saying…

Coffee Tour of Edmonton

Derek Pluim invites you to join him on his quest for the perfect coffee. Be there to quell your coffee addiction in the most pleasant of ways! Derek says: “some people believe that there isn’t enough coffee in the world for them to become a morning person. I intend to test the validity of that statement. Join me for an invigorating mid-morning ride as we meander our way to some of Edmonton’s best local coffee shops.”

Local Bike Store Day

Local Bike Store Day is slated to be an internationally celebrated day observed the second Thursday of June each year. Its purpose is to celebrate the contributions that independent bicycle stores make: encouraging local jobs, providing local services, ensuring cycling is accessible and affordable everywhere to everyone.

Critical Lass

Critical Lass is an inclusive monthly ride for female cyclists in street clothes, on a route suitable for novice riders, to promote cycling as an approachable, fun, everyday activity, organized by the Loop-Frame Love co-bloggers in Edmonton since June 2010.

Kidical Mass

What, you ask, is a Kidical Mass? It’s a lighthearted family- and kid-centred group ride that is now running in most North American cities. Once again hosted by the lovely ladies at Loop-Frame Love. The first ride was held in April 2008 in Eugene, Oregon and has now spread to over a dozen communities throughout North America and it debuted in Edmonton last year. The rides are meant to be family friendly bike rides through a community. All types of bikes, trailers, trail-a-bikes, Xtracycles, longtails, bakfiets, Long Johns, tandems, folders, trikes, and whatever rolls are welcome! We celebrate the fact that Kids are Traffic Too and aim for family fun on vehicles that don’t hurt the future! It’s just another excuse to pedal around town with your family.

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Alberta Election 2012 & Community Bike Shops

Today we look at the environmental implications of next week’s provincial election in Alberta. As Canada’s largest greenhouse gas emitter, the province’s policy decisions impact the whole country. Would a shift in power be followed by a shift in policy towards the oil sands? Plus, we get our hands dirty with a visit to the local community bike shop. This isn’t your ordinary bike store. Here they’ll teach you how to fix your own bike and provide all the tools to do it, and at a fraction of the cost.

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Laurie Blakeman writing on a giant calendar on the wall in her campaign office.

Edmonton Centre Liberal candidate Laurie Blakeman at her campaign office. Photo by Chris Chang-Yen Phillips.

Alberta Election
In recent years Canada’s reputation on environmental issues has taken a beating on the international stage, particularly when it comes to climate change. As the home of the oil sands and the only province still building coal fired power plants, Alberta is front and centre in the debate over the nation’s carbon emissions. On April 23rd, Albertans will go to the polls, and for the first time in 40 years the Progressive Conservatives face a serious threat of being unseated. Regardless of who wins the election, there will be implications for the country as a whole and for efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Today Terra Informa’s Chris Chang-Yen Phillips speaks to the parties about the environmental platforms they would implement if elected.

Policy Statements:

More on this story: iPolitics.ca: What would a Wildrose win do to Canada’s energy policies?


Community Bike Shops

As spring weather warms the country, more and more cyclists are hitting the roads. Their first stop is often the local repair shop for a quick tune up, but if your bike needs a little work there’s another option. Community bike shops are popping up from coast to coast, providing cyclists with the space to repair their own bikes, and teaching them the skills to do it. For more on the story, Steve Andersen speaks to members of community bike shops in Vancouver and Edmonton.

More on this story: List of Community Bike Shops in Canada

News Headlines

Canada won’t meet its 2020 emissions target
Canada will find it tough to meet its 2020 emissions target due to the continued expansion of the oil sands in Alberta. That’s according to a recent report published by the Thomson Reuters Point Carbon News division.  Although Canada’s output of greenhouse gasses was almost unchanged in 2010 from 2009 — news that was recently hailed by the conservative government — the government’s pledge to cut emissions to 607 megatonnes by 2020 is still far out of reach due to increased production in the oil sands.

More on this story: BBC News, ReutersPoint Carbon (PDF)

David Suzuki resigns from his charitable foundation
David Suzuki, Canada’s most famous environmentalist, says that he has resigned from the board of his charitable foundation to avoid being the a scapegoat for criticism and government attacks that would undermine his foundation’s ability to be an effective voice for the environment.  Dr. Suzuki said he had to leave the board and distance himself from the organization because the foundation was being targeted because of his personal views and actions.

More on this story: Globe and Mail, Vancouver Sun, CTV News

Wind Turbines
Now we head across the Atlantic to a UK study that has dispelled the belief that onshore wind farms are causing long term changes to bird populations. The study, published in the Journal of Applied Ecology was carried out by four European naturalists and orthinologists, goes against widespread allegations that clusters of turbines routinely cause serious damage to birds through collision with the revolving blades, noise, or visual disturbances.

More on this story: The Guardian, CleanTechnica, Original Report (PDF)

Fracking linked to earth quakes
Scientists at the upcoming meeting of the Seismological Society of America will be reporting that the rate of increase in earthquakes coincides with use of hydro-fracturing and its surge in use from 2006. The dramatic rise in earthquakes started in 2001 and covers a large area of the mid U.S. from Alabama to the Rockies in the west. Most of the earthquakes occurred within 24 hours of the injection of the wastewater and chemicals at the end of fracking operations.

More on this story: CBC News, Environmental Working Group, Think Progress

Winter Bike Riding & Distinguishing Civil Disobedince from Terrorism

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Winter Bike Riding Tips From The Edmonton Bicycle Commuters Society

You may have noticed that it snowed last week. Many people take snow as a sign that it’s time to park the bike and hop on the bus, but this is not necessarily the case. More and more people are opting to ride year-round, even in Northern cities like Edmonton, where the temperature can drop below -30 Celcius. This week, Terra informa correspondent Rebecca Rooney interviews Keith Hallgren – experienced winter cyclist, bicycle mechanic, and board member of the Edmonton Bicycle Commuters Society – about winter cycling.

The Edmonton Bicycle Commuters’ Society (EBC) has been a leader in the Edmonton and area environmental and cycling community since 1980. Our goal is to support the bicycle as a healthy and ecologically sound mode of everyday urban travel.

Distinguishing Civil Disobedience from Terrorism with Professor Laurie Adkin

In the space of less than a month, Greenpeace activists have held protests at three facilities related to the Alberta tar sands. Last week premier Stelmach suggested that the activists have been getting off too lightly. Alberta’s solicitor general went a step further and compared the protesters to terrorists. Not surprisingly, those remarks have raised a fair bit of controversy. For more on the implications of politicians equating civil disobedience with terrorism, our correspondent Steve Andersen talked toUniversity of Albert Political Science Professor Laurie Adkin.

Professor Adkin is the author of several books and many paper, her most recent work is titled Environmental Conflict and Democracy in Canada

“By grounding theory in empirical study of the discourses and practices of social actors, political economy, and institutions, Environmental Conflict and Democracy in Canada charts a new course for research in environmental citizenship. It is essential reading for anyone interested in political ecology and the environmental challenges we now face.

The contributors to this path-breaking collection argue that environmental conflicts are always about our rights and responsibilities as citizens and the quality of our democratic institutions. They offer sixteen case studies that range from First Nations resistance to the coastal fisheries crisis, to regulatory battles over genetically modified crops, and to the implications of suburban sprawl. These essays bring the perspectives of science, environmental justice, social movement theory, and institutional design to bear on environmental conflicts, provide a critical assessment of green democratic theory, and present the case for a Gramscian understanding of environmental politics. (UBC Press)”

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