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Winter Cycling & Christmas Tree Debacles

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This week we bring you two wintry archives! First a debate: which is more sustainable? An artificial or a real Christmas tree? Carson Fong finds out! Then winter cycling – sounds scary? Turns out it might not be as awful as it sounds.

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Headlines

The Calgary Board of Education and Bullfrog Power have teamed up to fund ‘Good Day Sunshine’, a recently announced initiative to install five new solar PV systems on Calgary elementary schools. [click here]

Environment and Parks Minister Shannon Phillips announced at the University of Alberta last week that the Alberta Youth Climate Action Council is now live and taking applications for youth aged 18-26 interested in giving feedback on climate change issues across the province. [click here]

A pilot study conducted by Texas State University and Bat Conservation International test-drove some new technology that reduces bat mortality from wind turbines by up to 54%! [click here]

Winter cycling

We take a trip down memory lane and revisit Terra Informers Carson and Trevor’s interview the president of the Winter Cycling Federation, Timo Perälä. Timo’s advice on navigating the mental blocks of winter cycling is perfectly timed with our snowy streets and recently expanded bike network.   

Which is greener?

In another archive, Terra Informer Hamdi explores the environmental debate between artificial and real Christmas trees, and how each stacks up in terms of contributing to climate change.

What’s happening

If you’re celebrating the holidays in the Edmonton area, come visit the U of A Forestry tree sale in the Corbett Hall parking lot near the University of Alberta hospital. Some friendly U of A Foresters will be there to greet you Monday to Friday from 3pm to 9pm and Saturday/Sunday from 9am to 9pm until December 21 or until the trees sell out. 10% of proceeds are donated to the United Way. [click here]

Download program log here.

Photo by: Martin Reis

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Talking Indigenous-led Environmental Assessment with The Firelight Group

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This week on Terra Informa, we have an interview with Dr. Ginger Gibson, one of the directors and founders of the Firelight Group, an organization that works to support Indigenous peoples and governments defending their rights and their land. Terra Informer Dylan Hall spoke with Ginger about the Firelight Group and the successes they’ve seen, particularly in Indigenous-led environmental review as a route for Indigenous Nations’ to express their right to self-governance despite a colonial Canadian state. More information about the Firelight group can be found at their website: www.thefirelightgroup.com, and the report on Indigenous-led environmental review spoken of in the interview can be found here.

Headlines

85 people have been arrested after protesters occupied five bridges in London, England on Saturday, November 17th in one of the largest acts of civil disobedience in UK history. The blockade was organized as part of a campaign run by Extinction Rebellion, a new group that aims to force governments to recognize and treat the threats of climate change and extinction as a crisis. Extinction Rebellion has organized various other acts of protest during the month of November, resulting in an additional 60 people being arrested for acts of civil disobedience. This Saturday was the climax of two weeks of protest, with approximately six thousand people taking part in the campaign. The group is calling for governments to reduce carbon emissions to zero by 2025 and to establish a “citizens assembly” to device an emergency plan of action. Extinction Rebellion now has offices based in central London and has eleven international events planned to take place in Canada, the United States, Germany, Australia, and France.
More information here: https://rebellion.earth/

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Download program log here

Photo by Forest and Kim Starr

PINHOLE CAMERAS AND CHANGING OCEANS

Terra Informa Nov 20 blog photo

Credit to Timkal for the image

This week we dive into an interview with Natalie Baird, a Masters student using participatory art methods to document Inuit knowledge in Canada’s north, and explore how this knowledge can be applied to climate change. Natalie’s work takes place in Pangnirtung – an Inuit community in Nunavut, located on Baffin Island. In the interview, Hannah and Natalie talk about sharing local knowledge, the accessibility of climate change science, how to make a pinhole camera, and much more. Headlines include the launch of the brand new Energy Efficiency Canada program, and the announcement of new (and much-needed) funding for conservation of Species at Risk. 

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Headlines

Efficiency Canada launched this week, aiming to be the “National Voice for an Energy Efficient Economy”. Efficiency Canada is a multidisciplinary agency focusing on advocacy and communication in regards to pushing for renewables in Canada. The project was started by Carleton University. With a focus on economic growth in the lens of renewable resources, the organization has already released a report of 2019 budget priorities for the federal government.

On November 9th the government of Canada released news they are committing over $9 million to almost 100, local-level conservation projects. over the next 3 years. Half of the projects will be funded by the Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk, which works with Indigenous communities to implement the Species at Risk Act.

Download program log here

Thinking Like A Plant

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What is it like to be a plant? Do plants make choices? Do they have free will or personality? Do they….think? This week on Terra Informa, we turn to Charly Blais’ interview with Megan Ljubotina, a graduate student at the University of Alberta, to find out about the ways plants make decisions to improve their vitality, survival and fitness. Ljubotina focuses on plant behaviour and the ways plants make decisions to improve their vitality, survival and fitness.

 

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Headlines

The Government of Ontario is in the process of carrying out public consultation to hear citizens’ thoughts on permits that allow bottling of Ontario’s water, particularly used by multi-national corporation Nestlé. Share your thoughts on the proposed extension of the moratorium on new permits or permits for increased water quantities here. More on this story can be found here and here.

The City of Edmonton has released its climate change adaptation and action plan and will be presenting it to city council’s executive committee on November 13th. [click here]

In global news, research out of the United Nations says the ozone layer is showing signs of continuing recovery from destructive pollutants and is likely to heal fully by 2060.[click here]

Download program log here.

Photo: M. Martin Vicente (Flickr)

George Kourounis Chasing Climate

California National Guard help battle the Rim Fire near Yosemite

Photo by: California National Guard 

This week on Terra Informa, we dip into the archives to bring back an interview with the infamous George Kourounis, a world-renowned storm chaser, adventurer, and host of the international TV show Angry Planet. His work has taken him around the world to document extraordinary natural events like tornadoes and bizarre wildlife phenomena. Terra Informer Dylan Hall spoke with George Kourounis about the different calibers of fear he’s experienced in his amazing career, documenting the Fort McMurray wildfire days after the city was reopened, and documenting climate change.

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Download program log here.

Photo by: California National Guard 

Urban Week at the University of Alberta

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The Growroom, released by Space10

This week on Terra Informa, we hear from organizer Hayley Wasylycia about Urban week, and the environmental and planning fun that they will be whipping up around campus!

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Urban Week 2017 & The Growroom

What is urban? Who is responsible for the urban environment? What’s the role of bees? What the heck is an IKEA Growroom? Terra Informers Shelley Jodoin and Carter Gorzitza ask these questions and more of Hayley Wasylycia, an organizer of Urban Week, which is coming to the University of Alberta March 20th to 24th.

Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/747808418709982/
YEG Growroom website: growroomyeg.com
Open Source Website Here: www.space10.io/journal/space10-open-sources-the-growroom

Download program log here.

Photo credit to The Growroom released by Space10

Sounds of Space & Thoughts for Our Future.

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Future Landscape by Naomi Vona, 2013

This week we take a look into the past and the great void, to shine some light on our current situation. First Shelley and Dylan talk to some Terra Informa Alumni about their experiences with Fun drive this year. Following that we listen to Ronald Wright as he discusses the past, and allows us to use this information when looking into the future. Lastly, we hear from Dr. Abram Hindle about his creative process when making music inspired by outer space.

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Talking Fun drive with some Alumni  

Alumni of Terra Informa talk with Shelley Jodoin and Dylan Hall about their experiences as Terra Informant’s at this years Fun drive.

The Trap of Progress

Last November, The Parkland Institute kicked off its sixteenth fall conference in Edmonton, Alberta. The theme was Petro, Power and Politics, and the opening keynote was delivered by writer Ronald Wright. Wright is best known for having delivered a CBC Massey Lecture which he called A Short History of Progress. For his lecture at the Parkland Institute, Wright drew on this earlier work to discuss our modern environmental crisis, including climate change and loss of biodiversity. To chart our possible future, Wright looks back to examine the collapse of civilizations all across the world. It’s depressing business, and more than one audience member asked the obvious question: is there any hope at all?

The Sound of Science: What the Universe Sounds Like

Alyssa Hindle and Matt Hirji interviewed Dr. Abram Hindle, a local computing science professor and Noise musician. Alyssa’s brother Abram uses his programming background with inspirations from nature and physics to create unique, and very technically based, sounds. Alyssa Hindle and Matt Hirji spoke with Abram Hindle about his Noise performances and music production.

More information:


Download program log here