climate change

The Role of Municipalities in Climate Adaptation

blooming onion

 

This week we’re reairing an episode from our archives! This past June Amanda Rooney and Charly Blais sat down with Danielle Koleyak, an environmental project manager with the city of Edmonton. We talked about how municipalities are taking leadership in climate mitigation while also making strides for adaptation. We also spoke with Danielle about Edmonton’s newly developing climate change adaptation and resilience strategy and about the power that local leaders and municipalities have in addressing climate change issues.

Since then it has been announced that the City of Edmonton will be hosting the inaugural  Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cities and Climate Change Science conference in March 2018. For more information click here.

Download episode now. 

What’s Happening

International Mountain Day

Canadian Mountain Network is hosting a Mountain Festival in celebration of International Mountain Day. There will be a number of fascinating and free events! Highlights include: Wade Davis, the Keynote speaker at the festival, speaking  about his book “Into The Silence: The Great War, Mallory, and the Conquest of Everest”,  a panel discussion on biodiversity, contaminants, and Indigenous food security in mountain places, and a talk given by photo historian and University of Alberta Professor Colleen Skidmore on her new book “Searching for Mary Schäffer: Women Wilderness Photography”. 

Change for Climate Talks

On Thursday, December 7, the City of Edmonton is hosting the Change for Climate Talks, an event to inspire Edmontonians into climate action. The event at the Art Gallery of Alberta will feature 11 speakers who will each get 7 minutes to talk about a climate-change related topic. The speakers include Edmonton’s poet laureate Ahmed (Knowmadic) Ali, Anna Ho from Paths for People, and Edmonton’s historian laureate Chris Chang-Yen Phillips.

Download program log here. 

Photo by: EROVIKOVA FOTO

 

 

Advertisements

Chasing Climate on an Angry Planet

Lava_Lake_Nyiragongo_2.jpg

This week, we sat down with George Kourounis, a world-renowned storm chaser, adventurer, and host of the international TV show Angry Planet. His work has taken him around the world to document extraordinary natural events like tornadoes and bizarre wildlife phenomena. Terra Informer Dylan Hall spoke with George Kourounis about the different calibers of fear he’s experienced in his amazing career, documenting the Fort McMurray wildfire days after the city was reopened, and documenting climate change.

George will also be speaking about this and more this week right here in Edmonton! The event takes place Wednesday, November 8 at 7 PM at the University of Alberta, in the CCIS building’s room 1-430. And the tickets are free! That’s tomorrow for you Edmonton listeners! Go to climateimages.eventbrite.ca to register.

 

Download episode now.

Download the program log Terra Informa Program Log Nov 7 2017.

Photo by: Cai Tjeenk Willink

ICEBERGS: THE TRUTH ABOUT THE MELT

Juliana_Marson.jpg

This week on Terra Informa, we discuss the 5800 square kilometre iceberg that broke off this summer in the Antarctica.

Download episode now.

Larsen C

The ice shelf named Larsen C was the largest segment to break off compared to its predecessors; Larsen A and Larsen B. It’s deterioration was being monitored for decades and its break in July attracted international attention. Anxiety around this event includes ice shelf vulnerability, rising ocean levels, and a change in ocean currents, among many. In talking with Dr. Juliana Marson we discover which fears are valid and which are merely scientific communication gone wrong.

 

Download program log here.

Photo by: University of Alberta

Indigenous Rights, Climate Action and Storytelling

2589700765_640c1bb48f_b

Protesters gathered outside the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers Investors Conference, June 16, 2008. Photo by ItzaFineDay via Flickr

This week on Terra Informa, we dive into the archives to bring you two pieces with an indigenous focus. First Dwayne Donald, a Professor in the Department of Education at the University of Alberta emphasizes the importance of storytelling in education through his unique position in the academic and Aboriginal communities. Today, we bring you the story of The Buffalo Child, as told by Dwayne Donald. We also revisit an interview with Eriel Deranger, an indigenous rights advocate and a member of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation (ACFN). She highlights the current climate crisis faced by Indigenous peoples of Alberta and the moral and legal obligation of governments to work with Indigenous peoples in building progressive and aggressive climate change solutions.

Download episode now. 

Supreme Court vetos seismic testing plans in Nunavut

The Supreme Court of Canada has overruled the National Energy Board’s approval for a consortium of Norwegian energy companies to perform seismic testing near Clyde River, Nunavut. The Court found that the NEB did neither clearly nor sufficiently consult the community and failed to assess the impact of the proposed seismic testing on the treaty rights of the Inuit. Though Clyde River’s former mayor Jerry Natanine, who first took the case to court, has said that the community is not entirely opposed to development, he applauded the decision for the ‘seemingly impossible case.’

More on this story:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/supreme-court-ruling-indigenous-rights-1.4221698
http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674clyde_river_scores_big_win_for_nunavut_inuit_at_the_supreme_court/

Fort McMurray aspen forests bounce back from 2016 wildfires

In Alberta, scientists with the Canadian Forest Service and the University of Alberta found that the Aspen forests damaged by the 2016 Fort McMurray fires are recovering. They have found around 100 new sprouts for every mature or dead tree counted and that growth is strongest where the fire hit the hardest. The findings will also be used to guide logging and oil sands companies reclamation efforts.

Legal action taken against 100 companies responsible for emitting majority of global greenhouse gases

This month, two California counties and a city decided to take legal action against 37 oil and coal companies for their roles in climate change-related damages including rising sea levels which may threaten San Francisco’s airport, BART subway, and highways. The group is claiming that these companies, like tobacco companies, misled the public and created a ‘public nuisance.’ This lawsuit follows a recent report that since 1988, 100 companies have been emitting more than 70% of global greenhouse gases This report affirmed a similar study published in 2013 which found that just eight companies have been responsible for more than 20% of global greenhouse gas emissions since 1885.

More on this story:
http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Marin-San-Mateo-County-sue-big-oil-over-climate-11294549.php
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/08/just-90-companies-are-blame-most-climate-change-carbon-accountant-says
https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2017/jul/10/100-fossil-fuel-companies-investors-responsible-71-global-emissions-cdp-study-climate-change

Download program log here.

Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation

blooming onion

Photo by EROVIKOVA FOTO

This week we have an interview about how municipalities are taking leadership in climate mitigation while also making strides for adaptation. Amanda Rooney and Charly Blais sat down with Danielle Koleyak, an environmental project manager with the city of Edmonton. Then we have a story about how the health care industry can mitigate its contribution to climate change, brought to you by Climate Radio.

Download episode now.

Municipalities and Climate Adaptation

In light of the United States pulling out of the Paris Agreement and the striking response from municipalities that in turn adopted the Paris agreement on their own, we thought that we would explore how municipalities can push for action and plan on how to adapt to climate change and environmental issues. Amanda Rooney and Charly Blais sat down with Danielle Koleyak, an Environmental Project Manager with the City of Edmonton. We spoke with her about Edmonton’s newly developing climate change adaptation and resilience strategy and about the power that local leaders and municipalities have in addressing climate change issues.

Climate Change in the Health Care Setting

Segment from Climate Radio: The health care industry has a critical role to play in climate change mitigation. Global Green and Healthy Hospitals, GGHH, is a network that brings together hospitals, health systems, and health organizations from around the world under the shared goal of reducing the environmental footprint of the health sector and contributing to improved public and environmental health. We caught up with Nick Thorp, the Global Community Manager of GGHH, and he explains what they are doing to improve public and environmental health. 

What’s Happening

Biomimicry Workshop

Do you enjoy the strange mix of nature, technology and science?  Biomimicry Alberta is hosting a two day workshop in Edmonton on June 24th and 25th. The workshop will explore strategies from the natural world and investigate how they can inform human design and technology. The weekend will include providing a broad introduction to the concept of biomimicry with a focus on the insect world– and the program includes presentations from local naturalists and researchers. This workshop is intended for students and professionals from any discipline and background interested in design and sustainability. Register for the workshop here

Download program log.

COP 22 with Dessima Williams, UN Special Advisor

no-22-photo-cop21_participants

Heads of delegations at the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP21), which led to the signing of the Paris Agreement. 

First up, news headlines on COP22 in Morocco from Climate Radio, a temporary FM radio station covering the Marrakech Climate Change Conference. Then, an ecobabble from our archives looking back at the 2015 Paris climate talks, followed by Climate radio’s inspirational interview with Dessima Williams, UN special advisor, urging young people to get involved with climate action.

 

What you need to know about the Paris climate talks

The United Nations Climate Change Conference is held once a year, bringing together members of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The 2015 conference was held in Paris, France from November 30 to December 11. This EcoBabble was made leading up to the conference last year, to explain why it would be an especially important conference.

Dessima Williams, United Nations Special Advisor

Exclusive for Climate Radio, Dessima Willams, UN Special Advisor, calls on young people to demand and take sustainable development goals and climate action.

The Right to be Cold

Snowflake12

This week’s episode is a book club in which Terra Informers Shelley Jodoin, Dylan Hall, and Amanda Rooney discussed Canadian author and environmental and human rights activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier’s book The Right To Be Cold.

Download episode here.

Sheila Watt-Cloutier is internationally known for her lifetime of outstanding tenacity and her work dedicated to defending the economic, social, and cultural rights of Inuit and other indigenous people. In 2015 she received the Right Livelihood Award “for her lifelong work to protect the Inuit of the Arctic and defend their right to maintain their livelihoods and culture, which are acutely threatened by climate change.” Watt-Cloutier is most famous for proving that climate change is a global violation of human rights and not merely an environmental issue.  In her words: “If we continue to allow the Arctic to melt, we lose more than the planet that has nurtured us for all of human history. We lose the wisdom required for us to sustain it.”

The terra informers read “The Right To Be Cold”, a memoir chronicling Watt-Cloutier’s life and work. In her novel Watt-Cloutier brings the reader into all aspects of her life; from a childhood of ice and snow in an Inuit Community in northern Quebec, to a turbulent southern education in a residential school, to political advocacy work in ever more prominent international roles.

Download Program Log here.

Photo credit to Wilson Bentley.

ECOnomics and ECOlogy with David Suzuki and Jeff Rubin

TI July 11 Photo

This week’s episode from our archives shines the spotlight on two environmental guru’s from Canada: David Suzuki and Jeff Rubin. Dr. David Suzuki is a celebrated scientist, broadcaster, and environmentalist who’s perhaps best known for his role on the long running CBC series, The Nature of Things. Jeff Rubin, formerly the chief economist at CIBC financial markets, is the author of Why Your World Is About to Get a Whole Lot Smaller and more recently The End of Growth.  In 2012, when this episode first aired, Suzuki and Rubin were touring from coast-to-coast on a book tour promoting ‘The End Of Growth’. In the recent federal election in 2015, leaders from every federal party were promoting the necessity of economic growth, showing that little has changed in mainstream political thought, and making this episode as timely as ever.

Download episode here.

David Suzuki and Jeff Rubin – The End of Growth

On May 28, Random-House Canada and Greystone Books announced that Jeff Rubin and Dr. David Suzuki would be visiting cities across Canada to deliver a message…one that you can’t afford to miss. Jeff Rubin, formerly the chief economist and strategist at CIBC World Markets, is the author of Why Your World Is About to Get a Whole Lot Smaller and more recently The End of Growth. David Suzuki is the celebrated scientist, broadcaster, and environmentalist who’s perhaps best known for his role on the long running CBC series The Nature of Things. His latest book, Everything Under The Sun: Toward a Brighter Future on a Small Blue Planet, examines the interconnected nature of life on earth, and our role in it. Together, they’re turning heads as they tour the country to tell Canadians that a sustainable future is still possible, but only if we’re willing to change the way we currently understand the economy and the environment.

Terra Informa Episode July 11 Log.

Photo credit to Jenni Konrad.