Energy

In the grey —Alberta’s relationship with oil in a changing world

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Image courtesy of The Gateway

This week we are lucky to have co-authors Elizabeth Gierl and Sofia Osborne read their feature article entitled “In the Grey” that was published in the April 2019 edition of the University of Alberta’s student magazine, The Gateway. In the piece, Gierl and Osborne set out to explore climate change, the Global oil market and Alberta’s complex relationships to the industry in the province. They also pose a question glossed over in mainstream discourse regarding Alberta’s oil production – who will even be buying it?

After the authors read their piece, Terra Informer Charlotte Thomasson sat down with them to delve into some of the research that went into the piece as well as to reflect on the current situation for energy production in the province as well as globally.

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Terra Informa Attends the Alberta Energy Efficiency Open House

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Last month, Terra Informers Amanda Rooney and Tasmia Nishat attended the Energy Efficiency and Community Energy in Alberta Open House.  There, they spoke with an MLA  on Leduc’s ambitious solar initiative, Solar4all Alberta, and community members interested in making the public feedback process more inclusive.


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MLA Shaye Anderson on Leduc’s Solar Electricity Initiatives

The city of Leduc recently installed Canada’s largest rooftop solar system at the Leduc Recreation Center. Terra Informa spoke with MLA Shaye Anderson about the installation, and about sustainability in general.

Solar4All Alberta

With a name like Solar4All Alberta, you can guess what Solar4All’s mandate is. But what are they asking for, specifically, from the government? Terra Informa finds out.

Queers and Pals Attend Energy Efficiency Forum

With public forums like these, how do we make sure that they are inclusive? We spoke with community members Parker Leflar and Rebecca Jade about how to make sure marginalized groups aren’t left out of the conversation.

The Fermi Paradox i.e. Counting the little green men & big blue planets

Paul Gilster enjoys one of the most unlikely of day jobs: writing full-time on the science of space travel as the lead journalist for the Tau Zero Foundation. You can find his nearly daily updates on the website Centauri Dreams. Trevor Chow-Fraser got in touch with Paul to help us understand one of the central mysteries of outer space, the question we’ve all had at some point when looking up at the stars—are we alone in the big vast universe? Or, is there life up there in the stars? And if so, well why the heck haven’t they come calling? That’s the question scientists call the Fermi Paradox.

Terra Informa August 23 Episode Log.

Photo credit to Unsplash.

Keeping Oil Underground + Inside Animal Minds

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This week, we speak to a cognitive psychologist and crawl into the minds of animals—specifically, the minds of our cats. But first, we discuss how tricky it will be to avoid climate change by keeping the world’s oil in the ground.

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Keeping Canada’s oil in the ground

On January 8, the top scientific journal Nature published a letter that outlined the amount of fossil fuels the world needs to leave in the ground to limit global warming. Titled “The geographical distribution of fossil fuels unused when limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius”, it was written by Christophe McGlade and Paul Ekins. The article drew a lot of mainstream attention, particularly here in Canada, due to the claim that 85% of Canadian bitumen reserves are unburnable. The Enbridge Professor of Energy Policy at the University of Alberta, Andrew Leach, is a contributor to Maclean’s magazine and wrote a response to the article. Andrew Leach spoke to Carson Fong about the issue.

Cats on cats

After speaking with cognitive psychologist Robert Cook about animal minds, Trevor Chow-Fraser asked a few of his friends to talk about their cats. And while they’re sometimes loving and hilarious — other times, they just don’t make any sense at all! Here’s his story about crawling inside the minds of our alien companions, including contributions from Robert Cook, professor of psychology at Tufts University, and the University of Alberta’s Hannah McGregor and Clare Mulcahy.