environment

Menstruation Innovation

periods

Photo by: Conscious Lifestyle of Mine

This week on Terra Informa, we’re talking about periods. Own very own Terra Informer Sydney Karbonik recently hosted an educational event about the environmental, social and economic impact of menstrual products and what other options exist for women. The event was called Menstruation Innovation and attracted interest from about 200 people but funding was limited, so a total of 26 people were able to take part: 15 new sustainable menstruators and 6 menstruation mentors. The mentors were all diva cup veterans and helped answer questions and guide conversation. In this week’s episode, we’ve got audio from that event along with Sydney sharing some facts about periods, the environment, and what women (and men!) can do to reduce stigma, raise awareness, and practice a greener period.

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Headlines

This Canadian company is changing menstrual health with its reusable period products
– click here to check out Lunapads

Cloth, Cow dung, cups: How the world’s women manage their periods

Download program log here.

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In the grey —Alberta’s relationship with oil in a changing world

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Image courtesy of The Gateway

This week we are lucky to have co-authors Elizabeth Gierl and Sofia Osborne read their feature article entitled “In the Grey” that was published in the April 2019 edition of the University of Alberta’s student magazine, The Gateway. In the piece, Gierl and Osborne set out to explore climate change, the Global oil market and Alberta’s complex relationships to the industry in the province. They also pose a question glossed over in mainstream discourse regarding Alberta’s oil production – who will even be buying it?

After the authors read their piece, Terra Informer Charlotte Thomasson sat down with them to delve into some of the research that went into the piece as well as to reflect on the current situation for energy production in the province as well as globally.

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Download program log here.

Conspiring with Plants

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At Terra Informa, we conspire with our houseplants! [Top row, left to right: Andrea Wiebe, Sofia Osborne, Amanda Rooney. Bottom row, left to right: Hannah Cunningham, Shelley Jodoin, Carter Gorzitza]

Maybe you’ve heard of the Anthropocene, but have you heard of the Planthropocene?

After reading an article entitled “How to grow livable worlds: Ten not-so-easy steps“, Terra Informer Amanda Rooney wanted to share the idea of the Planthropocene with listeners! Amanda got to speak with the author of the paper, Natasha Myers, about her relationship with plants, planthropology and how you might reconceptualize your relationship with plants.

Dr. Natasha Myers is an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at York University. You can find many of Dr. Myers publications, articles and other resources on her website.

Download episode here

Headlines Links

The Green New Deal – link 1, link 2

Norway’s Divestment from oil and gas exploration stocks – link 1, link 2, link 3, link 4, link 5

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Exploring the Unseen Environment

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Terra Informa in CJSR’s Studio A. From the top clockwise: Sofia Osborne, Dylan Hall, Olivia Debourcier, Charlotte Thomasson, Amanda Rooney, with Carter Gorzitza behind the camera!

This week we decided to shake things up on Terra Informa and take a page from one of our favourite podcasts, Radiolab! Specifically, an episode called Breaking Bad News Bears in which they tasked their reporters to pitch and produce a story about either breaking news or bears.  So we sent our volunteers out to report on either a breaking news story OR something that fits into the category: the unseen environment

We ended up with stories ranging from ancient organisms (both big and small) to deleted provincial parks and murmurations. We’re pretty sure that our reporters did an amazing job! What do you think?

Download episode now. 

Download program log here. 

It’s Time to Talk About Bugs

White-lined sphinx moth from Wikimedia Commons

Did you know that insects take up the most space on the taxonomic web of life? Did you know that about 75% of flowering plants are pollinated by insects? You might have also heard that insect biodiversity is on the decline. Sadly, what you may have hear is right. In a paper published in the Journal ‘Biological Conservation’lead authors Francisco Sánchez-Bayo and Kris A.G.Wyckhuys state “almost half of insect species are rapidly declining and a third are being threatened with extinction”.

Can you imagine a world without insects? To some it may sound like a dream come true but insects are integral to the functioning of our world! From the food we eat to the waste we excrete, we have insects to thanks (we would literally be swimming in detritus if not for decomposers!). Tune into this episode where we show these important little creatures some well-deserved attention!

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Checking out bugs with Peter Heule: Q&A with the Royal Alberta Museum’s live animal supervisor

Terra Informer Olivia deBourcier interviewed Peter Heule, a live animals supervisor at the Royal Alberta Museum, about bugs. Originally aired on The Gateway Presents, we’ll hear about butterfly migration, what animal science is all about, how kids understand bugs better than grown ups think, and what a wild world there is left to discover!

The Good News: The Big Bee!

In light of the bad news about insect populations, there is hope! Recently, the world’s BIGGEST BEE, thought extinct for 38 years, has been found alive on the Indonesian islands of the North Moluccas. As long as an adult thumb, with jaws like a stag beetle and four times larger than a honeybee this dinosaur of a bee continues to be threatened, particularly by deforestation for agriculture, but the very fact that it persists suggests that extinction is not inevitable! Hannah Cunningham explains in this ecobabble the ways that we can all help pollinators keep on keeping on!

From planning what you plant, building bee hotels (a simple DIY bee hotel) to reducing your use of pesticides, there are many ways you can make your world more pollinator friendly

Related Links

National Geographic

The Guardian

Investigating in Alberta

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Continental no. 9 oil well at Woodbend, Alberta. Photo Credit: Provincial Archive of Alberta.

This week we present a single interview between Terra Informer Sofia Osborne and Sharon Riley. Riley is an investigative journalist covering energy and the environment in Alberta for The Narwhal, an independent online magazine that reports on the basis that climate change is a real and happening issue.

Read Riley’s story on delinquent oil and gas wells in Alberta here.

Download episode now.

Download program log here.

Stephen Jenkinson on Death, Grief, and the Withering World Tree

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In this episode, listen to culture worker Stephen Jenkinson speaking about death, age, and grief, particularly in relation to this time of environmental loss and trouble.

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What happens when we live in a culture that rejects aging, death, and any kind of frailty or limit? Why is grief largely absent, at least publicly, as a response to climate change, species extinction, and environmental devastation? Is there a relationship? This week on Terra Informa, Dylan Hall spoke with Stephen Jenkinson, the author of Die Wise: A Manifesto for Sanity and Soul, and more recently Come of Age: A Case for Elderhood in a Time of Trouble. They explore concepts related to elder-hood, age, grief and death, and what these evoke when viewed through eyes apprehending the relentless destruction of diversity. Stephen has also just embarked on a ‘Nights of Grief and Misery’ tour with the Gregory Hoskins band, across the U.S. and Canada. For ticket information, click here. For a more complete biography on Stephen Jenkinson, his work, and Orphan Wisdom, the school he helped found, click here.

Terra Informa Program Log

Headlines

Teara Fraser is an awesome indigenous woman who started an airline to serve remote communities [click here]

The G7 Environment, Energy, and Ocean Ministers Meetings are coming up in Halifax, and despite big promises, the Canadian government persists with the largest fossil fuel subsidy of all G7 members. [click here]

Whats Happening

Tanya Tagaq with LitFest on her new book, Split Tooth [click here and here for more info]

photo by: Beryl_snw

Metamorphosis – Cinema on Climate and Change

This week on Terra Informa, we’re bringing you a piece centred around “Metamorphosis”, a new documentary playing in theatres across Canada this June. “Metamorphosis” explores the state of our current environmental crisis, and the psychological, emotional, artistic, and resilient responses of different people to this crisis, all using unusually spectacular imagery to communicate. We got a chance to talk with filmmaking couple Velcrow Ripper and Nova Ami; a group of Terra Informers also discuss our viewing of the film.

In news this week,

  • A new study shows fish are changing their migration habits due to Climate Change [Link – The Washington Post]
  • A Thunder Bay committee is taking another look at cleaning up a toxic pulp mill spill [Link – CBC]

If you’re interested in seeing “Metamorphosis” yourself, its screening dates are:

Globe Cinema, Calgary – Opening June 20

Metro Cinema, Edmonton – June 22 at 4 p.m. and June 23 at 9:30 p.m.

Cinecenta, Victoria – June 24 and 25

Vancity Theatre, Vancouver – June 26–28

 

Download episode now.

Download program log here.