environment

The Role of Municipalities in Climate Adaptation

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This week we’re reairing an episode from our archives! This past June Amanda Rooney and Charly Blais sat down with Danielle Koleyak, an environmental project manager with the city of Edmonton. We talked about how municipalities are taking leadership in climate mitigation while also making strides for adaptation. We also spoke with Danielle about Edmonton’s newly developing climate change adaptation and resilience strategy and about the power that local leaders and municipalities have in addressing climate change issues.

Since then it has been announced that the City of Edmonton will be hosting the inaugural  Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cities and Climate Change Science conference in March 2018. For more information click here.

Download episode now. 

What’s Happening

International Mountain Day

Canadian Mountain Network is hosting a Mountain Festival in celebration of International Mountain Day. There will be a number of fascinating and free events! Highlights include: Wade Davis, the Keynote speaker at the festival, speaking  about his book “Into The Silence: The Great War, Mallory, and the Conquest of Everest”,  a panel discussion on biodiversity, contaminants, and Indigenous food security in mountain places, and a talk given by photo historian and University of Alberta Professor Colleen Skidmore on her new book “Searching for Mary Schäffer: Women Wilderness Photography”. 

Change for Climate Talks

On Thursday, December 7, the City of Edmonton is hosting the Change for Climate Talks, an event to inspire Edmontonians into climate action. The event at the Art Gallery of Alberta will feature 11 speakers who will each get 7 minutes to talk about a climate-change related topic. The speakers include Edmonton’s poet laureate Ahmed (Knowmadic) Ali, Anna Ho from Paths for People, and Edmonton’s historian laureate Chris Chang-Yen Phillips.

Download program log here. 

Photo by: EROVIKOVA FOTO

 

 

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Environmentally Themed Music: The Moulettes

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This week Terra Informer, Charlotte Thomasson, got in touch with UK rock band The Moulettes.  Formed in 2002, the band’s latest album, Preternatural, has taken on an environmental theme. Charlotte spoke with celloist Hannah Miller about the inspiration for Preternatural, as well as coral reefs, Bjork, and inspiring the masses to take on big issues!

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Download program log here. 

Photo by Linus Nylund on Unsplash

Preventing Grizzly Deaths on Canada’s Railway Tracks

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Over the past fifteen years, there’s been a big spike in the number of Grizzly Bears in Banff National Park being killed by one surprising force: trains. We spoke with University of Alberta professor, Dr. Colleen Cassady St. Clair, and researcher Jonathan Backs, about their five year study into why this is happening, and how they are working to get the grizzly bear population back ~on track~

Stay tuned for our upcoming fundrive episode! If you tune in live to CJSR 88.5 fm and call in to donate you will be entered to win a number of cool prizes. Support community radio and keep our communities vibrant!

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Download program log here. 

Photo by: Roderick Eime on flickr

Cooking Up Better Food Policy in Canada

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This week on Terra Informa, we discuss the ongoing consultations about Canada’s food policy with master food strategists Juanita Gnanapragasam and Kathryn Lennon.

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Canada’s Food Policy

The federal government explains on their website that “A Food Policy for Canada will set a long-term vision for the health, environmental, social, and economic goals related to food, while identifying actions we can take in the short-term. A food policy is a way to address issues related to the production, processing, distribution, and consumption of food.”

Consultations about the policy are being carried out by the federal government across Canada. Although they didn’t organize one in Alberta, luckily our AB food organizations have our backs and organized their own consultation event called “What’s Your Recipe for a Better Food System? Towards a National Food Policy…” This event will be happening on Wednesday September 13, 2017 from 6-9 pm at the Edmonton Food Bank (Annex) 11434-120 Street. If you’re not in Edmonton or you’ve missed the 13th – no need to worry! You can contact your local MP or email the federal government at foodpolicy-politiquealimentaire@canada.ca. The hashtag being used for this discussion is #Foodpolicy4Canada.

Terra Informer Amanda Rooney spoke with representatives from two organizations present at the upcoming event on Wednesday; the University of Alberta’s Sustainable Food Working Group and the City of Edmonton. 

Juanita Gnanapragasam talks about her work on making food culturally inclusive and what she believes a food policy could bring to Canada. Ms. Gnanapragasam is a student at large member of the University of Alberta’s Sustainable Food Working Group.

Terra Informa alumni Kathryn Lennon also weighs in on what a national food policy might entail and the role of federal government in our food systems. Kathryn now works for the City of Edmonton as a Principal Planner in Policy Development working on the city’s food strategy alongside the Edmonton Food Council.  

Download program log now.

Photo by Lou Stejskal on Flickr

People’s Social Forum and Greenland Ice Sheet Melt

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This week on Terra Informa, we have two gems from our archives for you. First, we look back on the 2014 Peoples’ Social Forum and how that event brought diverse groups of people together to collaborate on building strategies to create social change. Next up, we have a story on the massive Greenland ice sheet melt of summer 2012, when 97% of the ice sheet melted in just four days.

 

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Messy, Loud, and Joyous (2014 People’s Social Forum)

We see all kinds of groups fighting for their own unique and equally worthy causes every day. In one corner you’ve got people defending refugee rights. In another you’ve got a group bringing down the cost of healthy food in Nunavut. Over by the door you’ve got an activist fighting against mining in her community. Often this is how civil society works in Canada. You’ve got a room full of people in NGOs, unions, Facebook groups, all fighting for their own cause, without seeing how they could support each other.

2014’s Peoples’ Social Forum in Ottawa brought together thousands of people from across Canada who want to shift the direction the country is going. And it basically said, to have the future any of us want, we’ve got to build a future together. Terra Informa’s Chris Chang-Yen Phillips was in Ottawa at the 2014 Peoples’ Social Forum a few years ago. Here’s his take on the messy, loud, and joyous business of bringing all these groups together.

Greenland ice sheet melt

In July 2012, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientist Son Nghiem noticed that 97 percent of Greenland’s ice sheet surface melted in just four days. Since Greenland’s Arctic ice sheet is massive – covering almost the entire island, and kilometres thick in most places. NASA estimates that if it all melted, global sea level would rise by about twenty feet. Son Nghiem’s first instinct was to double-check the data.  Chris Chang-Yen Phillips reached Son Nghiem in California for this story that summer, and with ice on our minds after the 2,240 square miles, trillion-ton piece of the Larson-C ice shelf broke off last month in Antartica, we thought we would re-air his piece.

 

Download program log now. 

Photo by NASA

Finding Meaning in Nature

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This week on Terra Informa, we bring from the archives a piece on positive psychology. Last year, Terra Informer Dylan Hall spoke with PhD student Holli-Anne Passmore about how connecting with nature enhances our well-being and helps us find meaning in life. Holli-Anne’s work has reached international audiences as well as psychology lectures at the University of British Columbia in Kelowna and MacEwan University in Edmonton.

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For more information on Holli-Anne Passmore: https://people.ok.ubc.ca/hapassmo

Download the program log here.

Photo by: Mitchell Joyce (https://www.flickr.com/photos/hckyso/)

There is no Planet B

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This week we explore the origins of Earth Day with an ecobabble that spans the decades from 1970 to the March for Science of 2017. Next, we’re revisiting an interview with Chris Hadfield from our archives.

 

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Earth Day: Cause For Protest or Celebration?

Lauren Carter and Dylan Hall hit the streets to find out what the public thinks about Earth Day and the March for Science. You’ll be hearing some of those interviews throughout this ecobabble on the origins of Earth Day.  Earth Day began as the environmentalist movement was making its voice heard with protests and educational teach-ins. Today, Earth Day is celebrated across the planet, although its focus has largely turned from political issues to small-scale individual action. Find out how this transition happened, and how the March for Science is changing that with this ecobabble produced by Lauren Carter.

Chris Hadfield Interview From 2013

Most of us will never know what it’s like being in space. We’ve all seen the pictures of that familiar glowing green and blue orb from the viewpoint of a spaceship. We have rich imaginations and age-long fascinations of what could be out there beyond the sky. But what does it smell like? What does it really feel like to be out there? From the 2013 archives, our own Matt Hirji talked to Commander Chris Hadfield about questions like these.

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Photo by NASA

Do It Yourself! A Tool Library Adventure.

Have a DIY project you’ve been itching to do but just don’t have the supplies? Striving to reduce consumerism and waste? The Edmonton Tool Library has got you covered. We dive into what it’s all about and how you can volunteer or become a member!

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Edmonton Tool Library

This week on Terra Informa, we take a trip to the Edmonton Tool Library, a non-profit that launched in January 2017 and it’s located in the Bellevue Community League. The library shelves are full of donated tools, some well-loved and well-worn, while others barely touched. Members can borrow the tools for their art projects, home renovations, yard clean-ups and more. Terra Informers Shelley Jodoin and Lauren Carter explored the tool library and interviewed two of the board members, Robyn Webb and Leslie Bush. They’ll tell you what a tool library is and how it can save you money, reduce your environmental impact and empower you to take on a do-it-yourself project.

Check out their website where you can view the tool catalogue and sign up for volunteer opportunities. You can also follow them on Facebook and on, Instagram, and Twitter.

Download program log here.

Photos by: Shelley Jodoin