indigenous

IPCC Climate Talks: Indigenous Perspectives

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This week we are bringing you more stories from the conference on Cities and Climate Change that was held in Edmonton by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change  (IPCC) from March 5th to 7th, 2018. In this episode, we have a conversation about renewable energy projects in the Beaver Lake Cree First Nation with Crystal Lameman, and talk with Laura Lynes of the Rockies Institute, a non-profit based in Canmore, Alberta.

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Crystal Lameman

Terra Informer Dylan Hall had the opportunity to speak with Crystal Lameman, a member of the Beaver Lake Cree First Nation. She is currently pursuing a Masters degree in indigenous peoples education at the University of Alberta. Dylan spoke with Crystal about renewable energy projects that she helped facilitate for her community.

The Rockies Institute

Next up is Laura Lynes, co-founder and board member of the Rockies Institute based in Canmore, Alberta. Terra Informers Chris Chang-Yen Phillips and Dylan Hall spoke with Laura about the organization’s work and the inspiration behind it. They also discussed the many threats facing our changing environment and how indigenous knowledge and science can work together to respond.

Download program log here.

Photo by: Velcrow Ripper on Flickr

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Petrol Spectres Haunt The Badlands, ACFN Takes A Stand, And PowerShift Flies Again

Halloween is upon us, and Terra Informa is celebrating with a visit to Alberta’s spookiest landmark: The Atlas Coal Mines. Delve deep into the dark recesses of Canada’s coal mining past, as we learn about Drumheller’s annual Big Boo! haunted mine tours.

Elsewhere in the show, we’ll take you to Fort McMurray to hear from supporters of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation, as that band challenges Shell’s plans to expand its tar sands production. And we’ll cross the country to Ottawa, where PowerShift Canada is training hundreds of youth to fight for climate justice.

Indescribably spooky workers changeroom, with uniforms hanging from the rafters, and full body paintings on the wall. Black & White photo, with lots of contrast.

The Atlas Coal Mine is spookier than ghost-babies even on a regular day. Photo by Flickr user newelly54.

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PowerShift

Terra Informer Kathryn Lennon spent the weekend at PowerShift 2012, which kicked off on Friday, October 26. A convergence of incredible youth from far and wide, PowerShift is raising critical questions about climate justice right now. Listen here as Kathryn brings us some on-the-ground audio from the events in Ottawa-Gatineau.

More info: PowerShift Canada

Atlas Coal Mine Special

With abandoned mine shafts and shadowy equipment looming all around you, Drumheller’s old coal mine sites can be creepy places at any time of the year. But the Atlas Coal Mine goes even further at Halloween – into the paranormal. Today’s host, Chris Chang-Yen Phillips, called up Atlas Coal Mine Executive Director Linda Digby in Drumheller, Alberta to hear more about their haunt for a good time – and the true stories that inspired their Halloween extravaganza.

More info: The Globe and MailDrumheller MailAtlas Coal Mine

Taking a stand with the ACFN

On Tuesday October 23, supporters of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation traveled up to Fort McMurray, Alberta. Their goal? To take a stand with the First Nation as its members presented their arguments to the Energy Resources Conservation Board and the Joint Review Panel.

The groundbreaking constitutional challenge is over the Shell Canada’s proposed Jackpine Mine tar sands project. The project would extend the tar sands further into the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nations’ territories and violate the nation’s treaty rights. Terra Informers Trevor Chow-Fraser and Annie Banks spoke with and heard from some of the powerful speakers taking a stand for the ACFN.

More info:

Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation and the Tar SandsYes MagazineNational Wildlife Federation, Edmonton Journal

Recent Updates:

Financial Post

Edmonton Journal

Winnipeg Free Press

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

What’s Happening

5th Annual Sustainability Awareness Week

The University of Alberta is holding its 5th Annual Sustainability Awareness Week from October 29 to November 1. Hosted by the U of A’s Office of Sustainability, this week has fifty different activities scheduled across the Augustana, North, Saint-Jean campuses. Space is limited for some events, so visit the Office of Sustainability website to RSVP today.

More info: Office of Sustainability – University of Alberta

Laugh for the Environment

On Saturday, November 3, Toronto’s Second City comedy club will be featuring Laugh for the Environment, and improv comedy show. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Toronto Green Community—a grassroots, non-profit organization dedicated to engaging Torontonians in environmental initiatives at work, home, and everywhere in between. Tickets are $20 and available through Second City either online at secondcity.com or by phoning the box office

More info: Toronto Green Community or by telephone: 416-343-0033

Iona Beach Shore Cleanup

The Lower Mainland Green Team Strikes Again! Help clean up the shore of Iona Beach in Richmond, BC by clearing it of Scotch Broom—a pretty but persistent invasive plant species. The clean up takes place on Sunday November 4 from 9:45am – 1:00pm. Carpooling arrangements can be made on the Green Team’s Meetup page. Instructions, tools, and snacks will be provided. Participants are asked to RSVP for this event.

More information: Meetup.com

Indigenous Environmental Movement, Green Economics, and Korean River Restoration

This week:

We’ve got a report on the controversial “Four Major Rivers Restoration Project” in South Korea. We take a look at ecosystem markets and how they can be used to protect the environment. And we bring you coverage of “People and the Planet: Building Solidarity in Environmental Struggles,” a talk on grassroots indigenous environmental initiatives and environmental racism.

Four River EcoFriends

Courtesy South Korean Government

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Review of the week’s top news stories

Newfoundland mill may burn tires for fuel

Ontario pulls plug on gas fired plant

Teck discharges mercury into Columbia River

Regulator gives thumbs up to oil exploration in the Gulf of St. Lawrence

Bathurst caribou conservation plan signed

Feature stories

Ecobabble: Ecosystem markets

Economists are sometimes criticized for failing to account for the effects of human activity on the environment. Often the services provided by an ecosystem, and the damage we do it, are simply labelled “externalities” and ignored. In today’s Eco Babble, David Kaczan tells us about Ecosystem Markets, and how they allow economists to bring environmental costs into the picture.

People and the planet: Building solidarity in environmental struggles

Marcus Peterson reports back from a panel discussion titled “People and the planet: Building solidarity in environmental struggles.”  The discussion focused on examples of grassroots indigenous initiatives addressing environmental issues and highlighted the links between environmental struggles and issues of activism, labour, indigenous rights, globalization, and capitalism in general.  Featured guests include: Eriel Tchekwie Deranger, Freedom From Oil Campaigner with the Rainforest Action Network; Melina Laboucan-Massimo, Climate and Energy Campaigner with Greenpeace; and Chelsea Flook, Associate Director of the Sierra Club’s Prairie Chapter.

Four major rivers Korean restoration project

The Korean Prime Minister has argued that the project promotes development in economy, environment, and culture. This project is to invest 14 trillion won ($12,461,000,000) to four rivers to do bank revetment, restore the ecological function of streams, to make bike roads near stream, and so on.  However, the project has drawn criticism from environmental and religious organizations in Korea for the potential environmental damage that could result. Correspondent Seon-ah Gu reports.