Nunavut

PINHOLE CAMERAS AND CHANGING OCEANS

Terra Informa Nov 20 blog photo

Credit to Timkal for the image

This week we dive into an interview with Natalie Baird, a Masters student using participatory art methods to document Inuit knowledge in Canada’s north, and explore how this knowledge can be applied to climate change. Natalie’s work takes place in Pangnirtung – an Inuit community in Nunavut, located on Baffin Island. In the interview, Hannah and Natalie talk about sharing local knowledge, the accessibility of climate change science, how to make a pinhole camera, and much more. Headlines include the launch of the brand new Energy Efficiency Canada program, and the announcement of new (and much-needed) funding for conservation of Species at Risk. 

Download episode now.

Headlines

Efficiency Canada launched this week, aiming to be the “National Voice for an Energy Efficient Economy”. Efficiency Canada is a multidisciplinary agency focusing on advocacy and communication in regards to pushing for renewables in Canada. The project was started by Carleton University. With a focus on economic growth in the lens of renewable resources, the organization has already released a report of 2019 budget priorities for the federal government.

On November 9th the government of Canada released news they are committing over $9 million to almost 100, local-level conservation projects. over the next 3 years. Half of the projects will be funded by the Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk, which works with Indigenous communities to implement the Species at Risk Act.

Download program log here

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