Oil

Speculating the Future and Utilizing Shame for Good

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This week on Terra Informa, we look to the archives to discuss the future of humanity and the place oil has in that future. First off we have Chris Chang-Yen Phillips with Brandon Schatz talking about science-fiction and its reflection of our current and future states. After that we talk to Jennifer Jacquet about the effectiveness of shaming in modern protest. And lastly we talk with Todd Hirsch about the future of oil in Alberta and the his view on the future economic framework of this province.

Lenses on the Future

Not everyone likes reading books about the future. Unless you already read science fiction, speculative fiction, or science-fiction as they’re collectively called, you might feel like the whole genre is just about slapstick robots and Orion slave girls. To be fair, some of it is about slapstick robots and Orion slave girls. But Sci-Fi can also teach us a lot about the way we live today. And help us imagine something different. For more on why your summer reading list should venture into the world of ansibles, hyperspace, and pigoons, Chris Chang-Yen Phillips spoke to Brandon Schatz, manager of Wizard Comics in Edmonton. 

Shaming Our Way Past Petrol

For activists trying to get all of society to shift to a renewable energy future, does it work to shame those keeping us in the past? Shame is divisive and combative. But Jennifer Jacquet thinks shame is a great tool in the activist toolkit. This academic in New York University’s department of Environmental Studies published the book Is Shame Necessary? New Uses for an Old Tool.

Alberta’s Post-Oil Future

As demand for Alberta’s oil drops lower and lower in the decades to come, how will the province’s economy change? How will we move forward and learn to prosper in new ways? For some perspective on these questions, we turned to Todd Hirsch, chief economist at ATB Financial.

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Photo by: Chris Yakimov (https://www.flickr.com/photos/doucy/)

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Keeping Oil Underground + Inside Animal Minds

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This week, we speak to a cognitive psychologist and crawl into the minds of animals—specifically, the minds of our cats. But first, we discuss how tricky it will be to avoid climate change by keeping the world’s oil in the ground.

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Keeping Canada’s oil in the ground

On January 8, the top scientific journal Nature published a letter that outlined the amount of fossil fuels the world needs to leave in the ground to limit global warming. Titled “The geographical distribution of fossil fuels unused when limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius”, it was written by Christophe McGlade and Paul Ekins. The article drew a lot of mainstream attention, particularly here in Canada, due to the claim that 85% of Canadian bitumen reserves are unburnable. The Enbridge Professor of Energy Policy at the University of Alberta, Andrew Leach, is a contributor to Maclean’s magazine and wrote a response to the article. Andrew Leach spoke to Carson Fong about the issue.

Cats on cats

After speaking with cognitive psychologist Robert Cook about animal minds, Trevor Chow-Fraser asked a few of his friends to talk about their cats. And while they’re sometimes loving and hilarious — other times, they just don’t make any sense at all! Here’s his story about crawling inside the minds of our alien companions, including contributions from Robert Cook, professor of psychology at Tufts University, and the University of Alberta’s Hannah McGregor and Clare Mulcahy.

Keeping it energized!

Mount Komekura Photovoltaic power plant in Japan - house ready?  (c) Sakaori, as found on Wikipedia

What is necessary for survival, comes in many forms…and on the minds of nearly every global citizen? If you guessed energy, good work. The controversy around energy sourcing, governance and use is frequently in the news, however how much do we really know? This week we explore just what oil pricing really is, dive into alternative energy possibilities for our homes, and learn about what could be possible from advancements across pond. Check out this energized edition of Terra Informa.

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Stranded Assets: Energy East & Undergraduate Research

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There’s a new pipeline in the works that could be bigger news than either Keystone XL or the Northern Gateway. We talk to a member of Climate Justice Montreal to find out why they’re concerned about Energy East. Gasp! Undergraduates contributing to environmental scholarship? The Earth Common Journal proves it can work. Plus, another Eyeopener captured at the recent Peoples Climate March.

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