Sea Shepherd

Fracking Blockade in Alberta & the Story of Paul Watson

Today we speak to members of the Blood Nation in southern Alberta who set up a blockade to stop hydraulic fracturing on their land. We investigate what’s meant by the term biophilia, and we bring you a review of the new movie Eco-Pirate: The Story of Paul Watson, which takes a look at the controversial leader of the anti-whaling group Sea Shepherd. All that, plus your round up of the week’s news headlines.

Download this week’s show.

Maija Tailfeathers standing in front of a fracking truck on the Blood Reserve in southern Alberta.

News Headlines

Peter Kent changes tone on coal regulations
CTV News
Winnipeg Free Press
Global News
Council of Canadians

Ontario’s proposed tax cuts bad for carbon emissions
Globe and Mail
Ottawa Citizen
CBC News

Ontario protests against wind power
Stratford Gazette
Simcoe.com
Meaford Independent
The Sun Times

Manitoba pig farmers voice opposition to Bill 46
Portage Daily Graphic
Winnipeg Sun

Conway Sandhills in PEI protected
The Guardian
Winnipeg Free Press
Environment Canada press release

Nova Scotia’s new provincial waste reduction plan
CBC News
CTV News
Canoe.ca

 

Fracking blockade on the Blood Reserve

Opposition to hydraulic fracturing has been fierce in many parts of Canada. June saw thousands rally against the controversial practice in Montreal, in early August a similar scene played out in Fredericton, and numerous smaller protests have taken place throughout the maritimes. Concern is also growing in northern BC. But in Alberta it’s largely been smooth sailing for the industry. At least until this past week. On Friday, members of the Blood Nation in southern Alberta attempted to block work on a fracking project, leading to several arrests. For more on the story, Steve Andersen spoke to Lois Frank of Kainai Earth Watch, the group that organized the blockade.

Video from the blockade is available here.

 

Movie Review: Eco-Pirate: The Story of Paul Watson

Today David Kaczan brings us a Green Screen Review of Eco-Pirate, the latest enviro-documentary from Vancouver’s Trish Dolman. This biographical movie focuses on Paul Watson, founder and leader of the controversial ocean-going activist group, Sea Shepherd. Eco-Pirate is currently screening in movie theatres around the country, so to help you decide whether to roll up and check it out, here’s our critical take.

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Sea Shepherd & Tar Sands Pollution

A new documentary chronicling the life of Sea Shepherd’s founder has just been released, titled Eco-Pirate: The Story of Paul Watson. So for anyone who’s thinking about seeing the film, we thought we’d give you a little background.

The federal government has just released its proposed environmental monitoring plan for the tar sands. The plan may have been developed in less than a year, but for critics of the industry it has been a long time coming. For years, scientists and environmental groups had heaped criticism on the monitoring systems tasked with overseeing the tar sands industry. Last fall the release of two reports by renowned ecologist Dr. David Schindler marked a tipping point. They clearly linked pollution of the Athabasca watershed to tar sands extraction — a claim both industry and the Alberta government had long denied.

Download this week’s show.

Image from the film Eco Pirate: The Story of Paul Watson

The Oil Spill’s Unseen Culprits & Victims, Royalties Defined, and Sea Shepherd

On this week’s show…

Alongside our usual review of the week’s environmental news headlines, today we bring you a Green Screen review of the TED Talk given by marine ecologist and author Carl Safina about the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. We also have a new Eco Babble defining what is meant by the term royalties – those fees paid by resource extraction companies to the provincial government owning the resources. Finally, we reach back into the archives for an editorial piece on the controversial ecowarrior organization Sea Shepherd.

Photograph by James Nachtwey for The New Yorker.

Environmental News Headlines

Northern Uranium Mine – Public Hearings

Federal Government – Oil Sands Assessment Report

St. Lawrence Lowlands – Hearings on Shale Gas Drilling

Central B.C. – Copper-Gold Mine Receives Federal Endorsement

Utah – Approved Oil Sands Mine

Ontario – Four More Coal-Fired Plants Shut Down

 

Green Screen Review: Carl Safina, “The Oil Spill’s Unseen Victim’s and Culprits”

This week Rebecca Rooney brings us a slightly unconventional Green Screen Review.  Usually these segments review films or documentaries on environmental subjects, but online videos are becoming an increasingly common excuse to eat popcorn.  Instead of reviewing a full length film, this week Terra Informa has a review of a 20 min online video recorded at the 2010 TEDxOilSpill conference last June.  The video is titled The Oil Spill’s unseen culprits, victims, and was delivered by author and scientist Carl Safina.  In it, he lays out some of the context in which the Gulf oil spill occurred and argues that the spill was no accident, but was the result of negligence which he describes as only a symptom of a larger problem with American democracy.

This TED talk is available to be streamed or downloaded for free here.

 

Ecobabble: Royalties

Royalties – what are they? Why do oil corporations hate them? Why do governments keep decreasing them? After you listen to this week’s Ecobabble, you’ll be able to draw your own conclusions. Andy Read and Marcus Peterson bring us an easy-to-listen guide on the convoluted world of taxes, mineral rights, and ownership.

Sea Shepherd

A dangerous and high stakes game of cat and mouse is played out every Antarctic summer season. The Japanese whaling fleet partakes in an annual hunt of approximately 1000 whales, however it is pursued by an environmental group called the Sea Shephard. Terra Informa takes a look at the past and present of the whaling issue. What does international law say on the issue? Who are the protesters? are they acting irresponsibly or courageously and will they succeed in their goal?

Sea Shepherd, the Revolution Wear fashion show, and Everyone´s Downstream 3

Terra Informa January 18 2010 (Download & Listen Here)

Terra Informa January 18 2010 (Download & Listen Here)

This week Rebekah brings us the news and here are the headlines and links.

On January 14th, the olympic torch made its way through Edmonton, but not all who gathered in Churchill Square at the end of the relay route were there to celebrate.  The Vancouver Media Coop reported that dozens of protestors were also in attendance, chanting slogans including “Homes not Games” and “No Olympics on Stolen Native Land.”  3 protestors were detained by police, but were later released without charges.

No2010 (http://no2010.com/node/18).

The Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games claim of the 2010 olympics will be the “greenest ever.”

Science Daily reported that a new study may help explain a dramatic increase in atmospheric methane concentrations that occurred millenia ago.

India is holding public meetings on genetically modified food crops .  The meetings commence following the commercial release of a genetically modified eggplant amid a storm of opposition.  The eggplant has been genetically modified to resist pests using genetic material from a soil bacteria.

(http://www.globalissues.org/news/2010/01/14/4188)

A dangerous and high stakes game of cat and mouse is played out every Antarctic summer season. The Japanese whaling fleet partakes in an annual hunt of approximately 1000 whales, however it is pursued by an environmental group called the Sea Shephard. Last week the environmentalists lost a high speed trimaran after a collision with a harpoon ship, yet they vow to continue putting up a fight. Terra Informa takes a look at the past and present of the whaling issue. What does international law say on the issue? Who are the protesters? are they acting irresponsibly or courageously and will they succeed in their goal??

Jade takes a look at Rev Wear (Revolution Wear. Check out some of the pictures here, here and here. The facebook group mentioned in the show can be found here.

This past weekend, the third annual Everyone’s Downstream conference, put on by oilsandstruth.org was held in Edmonton. It looks into the impacts of the Alberta tar sands and brings together members of effected communities. But attendees weren’t just from Alberta. There were people from Quebec who were concerned about pipelines in their communities. Others from Toronto were fighting the Royal Bank for it’s enormous investments in the tar sands. And people from BC were worried about the super tanker traffic that a proposed new port would bring. Across the country, everyone was being effected by some aspect of the tar sands. To find out more, Steve Andersen talked to Warner Naziel of the Wet’suwet’en [wit-soo-it-en] Nation on the BC coast about what’s happening in his community.

Terra Informa January 18 2010 (Download & Listen Here)