Audios

Gems from our Archives: Tale of the Evan’s Cherry

Weeping Cherry TRee

Weeping Cherry Tree in Bloom by Todd Heft

This week on Terra Informa we re-air a piece from 2014 that we almost lost track of! It’s the tale of the Evan’s Cherry, a prolific fruit in the Edmonton region. This story takes you through the adventure of past Terra Informer, Danielle Dolgoy, who went to some lengths to figure out how this plant came to be so ubiquitous.

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Headlines

Concern for Iqaluit’s Water Supply

It’s hard living in Northern Canada. Beyond the issues of melting permafrost and boil advisories, there’s a new concern for Iqaluit’s water supply. A study published this year by York University and University of Waterloo Researchers used hydrologic modelling to conclude that Iqaluit may face a water shortage within 5 years. Read more here. 

Seoul Street

South Korea’s capital city of Seoul recently opened “Seoul Street” — a kilometer-long green walkway built on a former highway. The project is part of a larger movement to make the city of 10 million people more pedestrian-friendly. It’s similar to High Line, another green walkway built on a former road in New York City. Seoul Street is a forest microcosm with 24,000 trees, potted plants and flowers. Read more here.

The Wolastoq Grand Council’s Campaign to Restore St. John River’s Maliseet name

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples includes the right “to designate and retain their own names for communities, places and persons.” This is what Grand Chief Ron Tremblay had in mind when he proposed the name change of the St. John’s River to the traditional Maliseet name, Wolastoq. Wolastoq means “beautiful, bountiful river.” So far, the New Brunswick government has rejected the idea, given that the river passes through Maine and changing the name would require co-operation with the US government. Read more here. 

Listener Survey

CJSR is volunteer-powered radio. Volunteers serve on our board, keep our music library fresh, make award-winning news programming, keep our equipment running, and of course spin music live for everyone out there in radio-land. What are your favourite shows? Who are your favourite hosts? Fill out this listener survey and let us know by July 5th!

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Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation

blooming onion

Photo by EROVIKOVA FOTO

This week we have an interview about how municipalities are taking leadership in climate mitigation while also making strides for adaptation. Amanda Rooney and Charly Blais sat down with Danielle Koleyak, an environmental project manager with the city of Edmonton. Then we have a story about how the health care industry can mitigate its contribution to climate change, brought to you by Climate Radio.

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Municipalities and Climate Adaptation

In light of the United States pulling out of the Paris Agreement and the striking response from municipalities that in turn adopted the Paris agreement on their own, we thought that we would explore how municipalities can push for action and plan on how to adapt to climate change and environmental issues. Amanda Rooney and Charly Blais sat down with Danielle Koleyak, an Environmental Project Manager with the City of Edmonton. We spoke with her about Edmonton’s newly developing climate change adaptation and resilience strategy and about the power that local leaders and municipalities have in addressing climate change issues.

Climate Change in the Health Care Setting

Segment from Climate Radio: The health care industry has a critical role to play in climate change mitigation. Global Green and Healthy Hospitals, GGHH, is a network that brings together hospitals, health systems, and health organizations from around the world under the shared goal of reducing the environmental footprint of the health sector and contributing to improved public and environmental health. We caught up with Nick Thorp, the Global Community Manager of GGHH, and he explains what they are doing to improve public and environmental health. 

What’s Happening

Biomimicry Workshop

Do you enjoy the strange mix of nature, technology and science?  Biomimicry Alberta is hosting a two day workshop in Edmonton on June 24th and 25th. The workshop will explore strategies from the natural world and investigate how they can inform human design and technology. The weekend will include providing a broad introduction to the concept of biomimicry with a focus on the insect world– and the program includes presentations from local naturalists and researchers. This workshop is intended for students and professionals from any discipline and background interested in design and sustainability. Register for the workshop here

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Riding the Trans Canada Trail

 

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Photo by Edmund Aunger in Cochrane, Alberta on the Trans Canada Trail

After spending the last two years on the Trans Canada Trail, Sarah Jackson is set to become the first woman on record to complete the 11,500 km hike.

This week, we have a story about the Trans Canada Trail. We have an interview with Edmund Aunger, a cyclist with a petition to make the Trans Canada Trail safer, and we have a follow-up interview with Paul Labarge, Chairman of the Board of the Trans Canada Trail Organization to get his perspective.

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What’s Happening

Deadline set for Canada to improve an Albertan National Park

The United Nations has given Canada 9 months to outline a plan intended to improve the health of the country’s largest national park, Wood Buffalo National Park, or risk having the park added to the UN’s list of endangered world heritage sites.The park is home to one of the world’s last self-regulating bison herds and the only remaining nesting ground for the endangered whooping crane. Read more here. 

Same-sex vulture couple hatch abandoned egg

A monogamous pair of male griffon vultures at the Artis Amsterdam Royal Zoo in the Netherlands have successfully hatched an abandoned egg after zookeeper Job van Tol noticed the egg on the zoo’s aviary floor. Van Tol reports that the vulture couple are working together to protect and feed their adopted offspring and the chick appears to be doing fantastically. Read more here. 

International solar SUN-day

This Sunday, the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada and the Charlie Bates Solar Astronomy Project present International Solar SUN-day at Hawrelak Park, an international effort being held in more than 20 countries around the world, celebrating the summer solstice weekend. In addition to educating the public on the science of our sun, this free event will have specialized solar telescopes and access to real time solar cameras for safe and stunning views of the Sun. Click here for more information on this event.

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Tuning in to Haida Gwaii

haida

Cox Island in the Haida Gwaii’s, with a red ship sailing through the waters at its shore.

This week on Terra Informa, we’ll hear two stories about Haida Gwaii; one about a non-profit working to bring renewable energy to the community and another about the man behind cutting down the sacred Golden Spruce.

Renewable Energy for Remote Communities

If you live in the city, try to think back to the last time you flipped a light switch and nothing turned on. Now, imagine depending on a plane full of diesel to come into town before you get power back on again! If you live in a remote community in Canada today, this is likely the energy system you rely on. For you, moving towards a more local renewable energy system is about more than just climate issues.

In an interview we originally broadcast in 2012, Chris Chang-Yen Phillips speaks to Alia Lamaadar , the former CEO for Cleantech Community Gateway. We’ll learn about Cleantech Community Gateway, a non-profit working to help the communities of Haida Gwaii build a new energy system.

Hadwin’s Judgement

If you were living in British Columbia in 1997, you may remember the story about forest engineer Grant Hadwin and the Kiidk’yaas or Golden Spruce.

It was a rare Sitka spruce tree that grew along the Yakoun River. Its glowing golden needles sparkling against the lush green forest. Regarded as sacred to the Haida Nation, the tree met a tragic and completely surprising fate. Hadwin cut down the Kiidk’yaas in protest against the logging industry.

Hadwin confessed to his horrific act and was summoned to court, but failed to appear. In fact, Hadwin has been missing since February 14, 1997 and is presumed dead. But his story lives on and the symbol of the Golden Spruce has evolved. An award-winning book called The Golden Spruce by John Vaillant has now inspired a documentary film called Hadwin’s Judgement, directed by British filmmaker Sasha Snow.

Natalee Rawat spoke to the two before the film’s debut at Toronto’s Hot Docs film festival.

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Photo by Stef Olcen

 

Edmonton’s Secret Orchid Collection and Fungus “Pesticides”

orchid

Photo of yellow and magenta orchids that could be a member of the extensive orchid collection at the Muttart Conservatory in Edmonton. Credit to JP Shen.

This week on Terra Informa, we discuss the orchid collection at Edmonton’s own Muttart Conservatory and learn how fungi can be used as more than just “fun guys” in your garden or farm.

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Orchids in Edmonton

Most citizens of Edmonton are aware of the Muttart Conservatory, but not a lot of them know about the ginormous orchid collection that resides there. You may know orchids as that overly fancy flower stores sometimes sell. Or as something you put in baked goods at times, because fun fact: vanilla is an orchid. How did this collection come to be? And what’s up with orchids, anyway — why do people care enough to form an entire society around them?

Tasmia Nishat speaks with Dave Nixon of the Orchid Species Preservation Foundation, or OSPF for short, to get to the bottom of this. Plant nerds, this ones for you!

Fungus Pesticides

Rebecca Rooney talks to Sunita Rajput, a University of Alberta researcher who conducted research on ways that farmers can use fungus in place of conventional insecticides.

Grant McEwan Bee Tours

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Photo by JP Shen

 

Reflecting on the Fort McMurray Wildfire

This month marks one year since the disastrous Fort McMurray wildfire. In this week’s episode we air an archive about the fire. CJSR volunteers gathered first-hand accounts of people who had to flee and met people who opened up their hearts and wallets to help. Then a University of Alberta wildfire expert provides some analysis of the wildfire.

Download episode now.

This month marks one year since the disastrous Fort McMurray wildfire. In this week’s episode we air an archive about the fire. CJSR volunteers gathered first-hand accounts of people who had to flee and met people who opened up their hearts and wallets to help. Then a University of Alberta wildfire expert provides some analysis of the wildfire.
 Thank you to this week’s contributors from CJSR Radio, Marco Visconti, Skye Hyndman and Pat McIlveen. The show was produced and hosted by Chris Chang-Yen Phillips and Trevor Chow-Fraser.

Download program log now.

Photo by the office of the Premier of Alberta on Flickr.

ONCE-IN-A-LIFETIME EVENTS

Agave Bloom

Photo by Joaquim Alves Gaspar

This week, Terra Informer Chris Chang-Yen Phillips ventured to Edmonton’s Muttart Conservatory to learn about a truly once-in-a-lifetime event: the blooming of the agave, an ephemeral plant that only blooms once before it dies. We also look at the decreasing rarity of once-in-a-lifetime storms with Terra Informer Jessica Kozlowski, as well as the truly amazing experience of a life-changing flood described firsthand by Terra Informer Natalee Rawat.

Download episode here.

The Bittersweet Life Cycle of the Agave Plant

A few years back, Terra Informa’s Chris Chang-Yen Phillips headed to Edmonton’s Muttart Conservatory in pursuit of a once-in-a-lifetime story. The Muttart houses exotic plants under its pyramids all year long, but he was there to see one particular plant: an agave. It only blooms once before it dies. Chris spoke to the Muttart’s Jade Dodd, and Brandi Eide, who manages the succulent collection at Arizona’s Desert Botanical Garden.

Ecobabble: The Science of Extreme Storms

What happens when once-in-a-lifetime storms shift to becoming the norm? Terra Informer Jessica Kozlowski discusses the ever-increasing imbalance of large-scale climatic events and why massive natural disasters are becoming more frequent.

A Flood of the Century: the 2005 Maharashtra Floods

In this piece from the Terra Informa archives, Natalee Rawat experienced a real Flood of the Century and lived to tell. In 2005, almost 1 meter of rain fell on the Indian state of Maharashtra on a single summer day. The city shut down completely, and the deluge caused at least 5,000 deaths, and cost 100 million USD. Natalee sat down with Ali Sultani to recall the events of July 26, 2005.

Headlines

Big cats of today are under the same threat as extinct Ice Age cats

A 2017 University of Sussex study identified that the African lion and the Sunda clouded leopard are facing the same extinction threats as the big felines of the ice age. The study determined that during the last ice age a lack of prey was the primary factor in the extinction of the 7 big cats. Read the study here

Enbridge commits to greater disclosure on Indigenous and environmental issues

The Calgary-based natural gas company has declared that they will increase disclosure of factors that go into determining indigenous and environmental issues when making acquisitions. This was decided despite two- thirds of Enbridge shareholders voting against it on May 11. Chief executive Al Monaco states that “We thought, and still do, that the idea of providing more information on our approach to investments and acquisitions was a very good one”, adding that the company would add the information to its corporate social responsibility reporting as an effort to be more transparent. Read the full article here

What’s Happening

Fresh MEÆT micro-fundraising event – May 24, 2017

Fresh MEÆT is a micro-fundraising event hosted by Edmonton’s NextGen in support of local food and urban agriculture initiatives with 7 presenters pitching their best project ideas. Attendees will get to vote for the idea they believe should get the funding. If you are sitting on a great food and urban agriculture project idea of your own, you can submit your own pitch by May 22nd for a chance to present at the event and win prizes!

The event will occur from 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm at the ATB Entrepreneur Centre Edmonton, 4234 Calgary Trail Northwest Edmonton, Alberta.

Tickets are $15, with $10 of each ticket going towards the winning initiative. Purchase tickets here

Download Program log here.

Alberta Rural Development Network

terrainformahouse

Photo by Marcel Schoenhardt

This week Terra Informer Shelley Jodoin interviewed Joshua Bénard, a sustainable housing project manager with the Alberta Rural Development Network (ARDN). They discuss ARDN’s aim to create housing that is both sustainable and affordable.

Download episode now.

Alberta Rural Development Network

This week Shelley Jodoin interviewed housing project manager of Alberta Rural Development Network (ARDN), Joshua Bénard.  They discuss how ARDN works with provincial universities and colleges, rural communities, and other organizations to create sustainable housing. You can check out the ARDN’s website here.

Headlines

International Compost Awareness Week, May 7th- 13th

If you live in Edmonton, the city has Compost S’cool starting May 13th, from 10 am to 4 pm on weekends and holidays until Labour day. Compost S’cool is a program meant to help you start your own composting operation; whether it be a large backyard bin or a small bin of worms. You can find them on location between the John Janzen Nature Centre and Fort Edmonton Park, and check out the Facebook page here. 

For listeners not in Edmonton – check out your city’s website or check out the compost council of Canada’s website here for more information. 

Biomimicry Alberta Workshop: Summer Series 2017

Biomimicry in this context is drawing inspiration from the natural world for example, the beak of kingfisher birds have provided the blueprint for more aerodynamic designs in trains. Learn more here. 

The third annual Alberta Biomimicry Workshop will be happening on the University of Alberta campus on June 24 and 25.  Registration is $150 but there is a discounted rate for students! You can find more information here. 

Oil spill busting technology gets $1.7M federal funding boost

UAlberta’s Ingenuity Lab developing nanotech mesh that pulls oil out of water, then releases it so it can be reused. Read the article here.

UAlberta named one of Canada’s greenest employers for ninth year in a row

University recognized for employee programs, innovative facilities. Read the article here.

 

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